Document Type

Post-Print

Publication Date

1-2013

Subjects

Communication in medicine, Women's health services, Health disparities, Narration (Rhetoric), Health and race -- Psychological aspects, Cervical cancer -- Prevention

Abstract

This research empirically tests whether using a fictional narrative produces a greater impact on health-related knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intention than presenting the identical information in a more traditional, nonfiction, non-narrative format. European American, Mexican American, and African American women (N = 758) were surveyed before and after viewing either a narrative or non-narrative cervical cancer-related film. The narrative was more effective in increasing cervical cancer-related knowledge and attitudes. Moreover, in response to the narrative featuring Latinas, Mexican Americans were most transported, identified most with the characters, and experienced the strongest emotions. Regressions revealed that transportation, identification with specific characters, and emotion each contributed to shifts in knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intentions. Thus, narrative formats may provide a valuable tool in reducing health disparities.

Description

This is the author's version of an article that was accepted and subsequesntly published as:

Murphy, S. T., Frank, L. B., Chatterjee, J. S., & Baezconde-Garbanati, L. (2013). Narrative versus Nonnarrative: The Role of Identification, Transportation, and Emotion in Reducing Health Disparities. Journal Of Communication, 63(1), 116-137,

Published in final form at Wiley Online.

DOI

10.1111/jcom.12007

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/14778

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