Start Date

17-5-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

17-5-2017 7:00 PM

Subjects

Riparian areas -- Oregon -- Clackamas River Basin -- Restoration, Riparian restoration -- Oregon -- Clackamas River, Watershed restoration -- Oregon -- Clackamas River Basin

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/20328

Description

Rivers and streams within the Clackamas River Basin are not currently meeting water quality standards in terms of temperature. The Clackamas River Basin Council (CRBC) designed a restoration program to address the thermal loading on behalf of Portland General Electric (PGE) in which native trees and shrubs are planted along streams to restore riparian canopy cover. Solar radiation can be blocked by restoring canopy cover and is an effective way to provide shade, as well as providing ancillary environmental benefits such as enhanced wildlife habitat and erosion control. Stream and vegetation data were collected at nine sites to model the increase in shade from the restoration plantings. Using DEQ’s Shade-a-lator model, shade was predicted in future scenarios at 10, 20, and 50 years compared to the current baseline condition. Modeling results suggest increases in shade at each site, which will help to mitigate excessive thermal inputs. The predicted scenarios provide a framework to evaluate the effectiveness of CRBC’s restoration program.

Comments

Rachel Barksdale was advised by Dr. Jeffrey Gerwing.

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May 17th, 4:00 PM May 17th, 7:00 PM

Modeling the effectiveness of riparian restoration on stream shading in the Clackamas River Basin

Rivers and streams within the Clackamas River Basin are not currently meeting water quality standards in terms of temperature. The Clackamas River Basin Council (CRBC) designed a restoration program to address the thermal loading on behalf of Portland General Electric (PGE) in which native trees and shrubs are planted along streams to restore riparian canopy cover. Solar radiation can be blocked by restoring canopy cover and is an effective way to provide shade, as well as providing ancillary environmental benefits such as enhanced wildlife habitat and erosion control. Stream and vegetation data were collected at nine sites to model the increase in shade from the restoration plantings. Using DEQ’s Shade-a-lator model, shade was predicted in future scenarios at 10, 20, and 50 years compared to the current baseline condition. Modeling results suggest increases in shade at each site, which will help to mitigate excessive thermal inputs. The predicted scenarios provide a framework to evaluate the effectiveness of CRBC’s restoration program.