Start Date

17-5-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

17-5-2017 7:00 PM

Subjects

Introduced aquatic organisms -- Coastal ecosystems -- Control, Aquatic ecology, Environmental monitoring, Introduced aquatic organisms -- Effect of artificial structures on

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/20384

Description

Artificial structures created for aquatic anthropogenic activities are often colonized and fouled by many non-native species, few of which have invaded natural areas. Some research has indicated predation is limiting the spread of non-native species, while other research has indicated that it is dispersal-driven. To determine the effects of dispersal limitation and predation on the risk to surrounding habitats of being invaded by non-native species established on marina docks, we used a three-factor design, deploying seven unglazed ceramic panels per each treatment combination of 1) inside versus outside a marina in Yaquina Bay, Oregon; 2) cage keeping out predators >mesh size, no cage, or partial cage; 3) fixed near the substrata (benthic) versus floating 1m below the surface. We also moved panels of either adults or recruits from floating in the marina to any of the treatment combinations to test if they would have lower survival outside by the substrate. The community on panels suspended in the marina only minimally overlapped with panels outside of the marina near the bottom. However, there was no difference between the cage treatments, which suggests that predators excluded by the cages are not responsible for the observed differences in species richness or composition.

 
May 17th, 4:00 PM May 17th, 7:00 PM

The Limitation of Spread of Non-native Marine Invertebrates from Artificial Structures to Natural Habitats

Artificial structures created for aquatic anthropogenic activities are often colonized and fouled by many non-native species, few of which have invaded natural areas. Some research has indicated predation is limiting the spread of non-native species, while other research has indicated that it is dispersal-driven. To determine the effects of dispersal limitation and predation on the risk to surrounding habitats of being invaded by non-native species established on marina docks, we used a three-factor design, deploying seven unglazed ceramic panels per each treatment combination of 1) inside versus outside a marina in Yaquina Bay, Oregon; 2) cage keeping out predators >mesh size, no cage, or partial cage; 3) fixed near the substrata (benthic) versus floating 1m below the surface. We also moved panels of either adults or recruits from floating in the marina to any of the treatment combinations to test if they would have lower survival outside by the substrate. The community on panels suspended in the marina only minimally overlapped with panels outside of the marina near the bottom. However, there was no difference between the cage treatments, which suggests that predators excluded by the cages are not responsible for the observed differences in species richness or composition.