Date of Award

2016

Document Type

Thesis

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Eric Mankowski

Subjects

Fathers -- Services for, Fathers -- Conduct of life, Fatherhood -- Study and teaching, Abusive men -- Counseling of, Child abuse -- Prevention, Intimate partner violence -- Prevention, Family violence -- Prevention

DOI

10.15760/honors.297

Abstract

Intervention classes for fathers that use family violence are in the very early stages of development. The purpose of this paper is to better understand how fathering interventions are minimizing risks and maximizing benefits in working to address the service and knowledge gaps toward father’s that use IPV, CM, or both IPV and CM. Initially, the service and knowledge gaps are identified as well as the perceived benefits and risks of offering fathering interventions. Then, based on the analysis, several recommendations are made for the implementation of these interventions. Following this, I describe two widely available intervention curricula, and discuss the ways these classes are similar and dissimilar from the recommendations. Taken together, though the two programs contain similar content and recommendations, they differ in their therapy delivery methods, depth of focus on fathering intervention, and on what types of father-perpetrated violence they address. Both intervention classes illustrate some of the perceived benefits as well as risks identified in the literature. Recommendations are made for future intervention practice, related necessary research, and needed policy. This paper concludes with the acknowledgement that these interventions are working to create collaborative systems that provide safety to victims, assess men’s individual risks, and use well thought out and effective therapeutic strategies to elicit behavior changes in fathers.

Comments

An undergraduate honors thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in University Honors and Psychology

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/17585

Share

COinS