Date of Award

2017

Document Type

Thesis

Department

Sociology

First Advisor

Richard Lockwood

Subjects

Sex instruction -- Study and teaching, Teenagers -- Effect of inadequate sex education on, Sex instruction -- Effect of lack of access to healthcare on, MEDLINE, National Institutes of Health (U.S.). PubMed Central

DOI

10.15760/honors.425

Abstract

This systematic review and subsequent analysis examines the harm caused by inadequate sexual education in countries with minimal access to healthcare. This review relies on PubMed as its singular database. PubMed is a free search engine that utilizes the MEDLINE database of references on life sciences and biomedical topics. This database is maintained by The United States Library of Medicine and The National Institutes of Health, therefore it is an authoritative entity on the subject of health research. Assessing the breadth of knowledge represented in PubMed related to this issue can be extrapolated to estimate the current state of salient knowledge within The United States Library of Medicine and The National Institutes of Health. The bulk of this review explores the current state of knowledge on the relationship between development and relative burden of disease, with a specific focus on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, hereon referred to as HIV/AIDS. Search results were filtered for the sub-saharan African region, due to its relative poverty and development status within a globalized system. Adolescents age thirteen to eighteen are the age cohort chosen for this study, with the intention of exploring the risks associated with sexual education during the formative years of sexual identity development. The analysis addresses world systems theory and healthcare in a globalized society.

Comments

An undergraduate honors thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in University Honors and Sociology.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/20431

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