Date of Award

2014

Document Type

Thesis

Department

Sociology

First Advisor

Peter Collier

Subjects

Online social networks -- Psychological aspects, Social interaction -- Philosophy, Erving Goffman, Online identities -- Analysis

DOI

10.15760/honors.64

Abstract

Over the years, social networking sites have grown into a more modern way of socializing. The widespread use and increasing time spent on these sites cause users to create online self-presentations in order to participate. Using Goffman’s dramaturgical theory, this study looked to explain the effects of feedback associated with online identities on social networking sites with offline identity development and presentation. An online Likert-scale survey was used gauge participant’s feelings about the social networking sites they used. Analysis of the collected data used a regression model to explore possible links between feedback on posts online and individuals’ internalization of that feedback into offline identities. Although no significant relationships were identified, the findings suggest directions for future research.

Comments

An undergraduate honors thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in University Honors and sociology.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/11971

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