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PSU McNair Scholars Online Journal

Subjects

College students -- Race discrimination, Racism in education, College students -- United States -- Microaggressions, Microaggressions -- Effect on student success

Abstract

This study attempts to contribute to the research on how microaggressions affect performance of multiracial and monoracial college students in both social and academic realms. Microaggressions were explored through online surveys distributed via email to several hundred students. Participants consisted of students over the age of 18 at an urban institution in the Pacific Northwest. Bivariate logistical regression and axial coding were used to analyze participant responses. The first hypothesis for this study is that multiracial college students experience more microaggressions in social settings, while monoracial students experience more microaggressions in academic settings. The second hypothesis is that multiracial students experience privilege in academic settings, while monoracial students experience privilege in social settings. The final hypothesis is that the shade of skin tone of participants impact their experiences with privilege, as well as their experience of microaggressions. Researchers found that multiracial students have a higher likelihood of experiencing microaggressions in a social setting and people with darker skin tones have a higher likelihood of experiencing microaggressions in an academic setting.

DOI

10.15760/mcnair.2016.6

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/17454

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