Presentation Type

Presentation

Description

In the past two years, OSU has purchased e-books at an ever-increasing rate. These e-books are acquired through a variety of avenues: downloaded from Amazon to Kindles, packaged deals from aggregators and publishers, research reports purchased singly from nonprofits, user-initiated purchases executed on the third viewing of a title. Some are stored locally on e-readers or in our institutional repository; others reside at a remote URL sometimes requiring a password and i.d. – or sometimes not. Cataloging copy might be downloaded from OCLC for individual titles, provided free by vendors in less than full form, purchased as a set from OCLC, or downloaded from OCLC via a list of OCLC control numbers provided by the vendor. The plethora of formats, access methods, and cataloging has resulted in the design of separate workflows for each e-book provider. When e-books are purchased from a particular vendor, a process begins whereby staff must design a workflow, determining who will be responsible for acquisition and cataloging of the titles. Libraries can expect this environment to continue into the future as e-book distributors are unlikely to standardize methods of disseminating their products or the metadata used to describe them. This program will look at OSU’s experience with e-books, describing challenges and successes with mainstreaming their acquisition and cataloging.

Conference Track

Other

Start Date

11-2-2011 11:30 AM

End Date

11-2-2011 12:30 PM

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/19938

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Feb 11th, 11:30 AM Feb 11th, 12:30 PM

The E-Book Experience At Oregon State University

In the past two years, OSU has purchased e-books at an ever-increasing rate. These e-books are acquired through a variety of avenues: downloaded from Amazon to Kindles, packaged deals from aggregators and publishers, research reports purchased singly from nonprofits, user-initiated purchases executed on the third viewing of a title. Some are stored locally on e-readers or in our institutional repository; others reside at a remote URL sometimes requiring a password and i.d. – or sometimes not. Cataloging copy might be downloaded from OCLC for individual titles, provided free by vendors in less than full form, purchased as a set from OCLC, or downloaded from OCLC via a list of OCLC control numbers provided by the vendor. The plethora of formats, access methods, and cataloging has resulted in the design of separate workflows for each e-book provider. When e-books are purchased from a particular vendor, a process begins whereby staff must design a workflow, determining who will be responsible for acquisition and cataloging of the titles. Libraries can expect this environment to continue into the future as e-book distributors are unlikely to standardize methods of disseminating their products or the metadata used to describe them. This program will look at OSU’s experience with e-books, describing challenges and successes with mainstreaming their acquisition and cataloging.