Advisor

John Heflin

Date of Award

1987

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (EdD)

Department

Education

Physical Description

3, vii, 192 leaves 28 cm.

Subjects

School administrators -- Washington (State) -- Rating of, Education and state -- Washington (State)

DOI

10.15760/etd.1350

Abstract

The present study examined the implementation of a Washington state policy which requires that school administrators give their subordinates the opportunity to appraise their performance. The importance of this topic is suggested by research findings that indicate appraisals of principals by teachers yield information to assess and improve the administrative skills of principals. Research questions sought information on activities at the state level which served to promote implementation of the state policy. Other research questions sought information on the extent and impact of local school district policies and practices that were consistent with the state policy. The methodology for the study combined survey research and interviews. The interview methodology was used to collect qualitative information on the efforts of officials at the state level to promote local implementation of the state policy. Mailed surveys were used to collect data on the extent and impact of local school district policies and practices consistent with the state policy. The results of this study showed that none of the officials interviewed cited any activities at the state level, which promoted the implementation of the state policy. Results of the mailed surveys indicated that only 7% of local school districts had adopted policies on appraisal by subordinates that included the requirements of the state policy. Moreover, only 22% to 29% of school administrators were found to have complied with the requirements of the state policy by giving their subordinates the opportunity to appraise their performance. School personnel in a position to evaluate the effects of appraisal strategies reported that these strategies were beneficial for assessing administrator performance. Some school personnel also reported improvements in administrator performance and the school program, as a result of these appraisal activities. However, elements of the strategy described in state policy neither ensure changes in administrative behavior, nor protect subordinates against reprisals for making the appraisal.

Description

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Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/4444

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