Advisor

James Strathman

Date of Award

Spring 5-12-2015

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Urban Studies and Planning

Department

Urban Studies and Planning

Physical Description

1 online resource (viii, 137 pages)

Subjects

Cities and towns -- United States -- Growth -- Management, Urbanization -- United States, Urban transportation -- United States, Regional planning -- United States, Land use -- United States -- Planning

DOI

10.15760/etd.2300

Abstract

During the past several decades, most U.S. metropolitan areas have experienced strong suburbanization of housing and jobs (i.e., urban sprawl). The sprawl that arises from urban growth has become a big issue in many metropolitan areas in the U.S. In response, there has been increased interest in urban containment policies. There are contrasting views (planning-oriented vs. market-oriented) of urban sprawl and urban containment policies. Planning-oriented scholars asserted the problems of 'geographic sprawl (GS)' and the positive effects of urban containment polices, while market-oriented scholars asserted the problems of 'economic sprawl (ES)' and the negative or negligible effects of urban containment policies. Therefore, this dissertation analyzed whether urban containment policies affect urban sprawl, employment center formation, and urban commuting.

The results of this dissertation indicate that urban containment policies play an important role in affecting urban sprawl, employment center formation, and urban commuting, as well as explaining the contrasting views (planning-oriented vs. market-oriented) of urban containment policies. Implementing urban containment policies can produce positive effects such as compact development, which can promote J-H balance. However, as seen in the relationship between urban containment policies, urban sprawl and housing values, stronger urban containment policies can produce negative effects, such as traffic congestion and an increase in housing prices.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/15469

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