Published In

Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2012

Subjects

Distributive justice, Neoclassical school of economics, Feminist theory, Migration

Abstract

This paper explores the implications of empirical theories of migration for normative accounts of migration and distributive justice. It examines neo-classical economics, world-systems theory, dual labor market theory, and feminist approaches to migration and contends that neo-classical economic theory in isolation provides an inadequate understanding of migration. Other theories provide a fuller account of how national and global economic, political, and social institutions cause and shape migration flows by actively affecting people's opportunity sets in source countries and by admitting people according to social categories such as class and gender. These empirical theories reveal the causal impact of institutions regulating migration and clarify moral obligations frequently overlooked by normative theorists.

Description

Published by The Global Justice Network

Global Justice: Theory Practice Rhetoric provides open access to all of its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. Such access is associated with increased readership and citation levels.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/12393