Start Date

20-5-2017 11:15 AM

End Date

20-5-2017 11:30 AM

Description

Jamaal Green is a doctoral candidate in the Urban Studies and Planning Department at PSU. He is an economic development planners, and a sometimes economic geographer, interested in the intersections of land-use and labor market outcomes. Specifically, his dissertation will be studying the conversion of industrial land to non-industrial uses in the country’s fifty largest cities and the politics therein. He cares passionately about the potential for planning to be a progressive force in the development of our cities. He uses GIS as a way to explore questions about the socio-spatial and socio-economic relations of city-regions from the locations of payday loan establishments to mapping the changing geography of manufacturing labor.

Comments

The Trouble with Data: Issues in Production, Curation and Access
Jamaal Green, Jim Thatcher, and Beth Pickard. Moderator: Tim Hitchins

Beth Pickard's presentation can be found here.

Panel description:

Data is more than just a spreadsheet with values. Its production, curation, and accessibility are rooted in power dynamics determined by those that control it. Because most data rests in the domain of government agencies and private corporations, its existence, or non-existence, benefits their interests most. This panel will explore some of the underlying problems with data, challenges with access, initiatives for protecting data from political interference, and resources that work to keep it free and openly available.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/20645

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May 20th, 11:15 AM May 20th, 11:30 AM

In Support of “Difficult Data”

Jamaal Green is a doctoral candidate in the Urban Studies and Planning Department at PSU. He is an economic development planners, and a sometimes economic geographer, interested in the intersections of land-use and labor market outcomes. Specifically, his dissertation will be studying the conversion of industrial land to non-industrial uses in the country’s fifty largest cities and the politics therein. He cares passionately about the potential for planning to be a progressive force in the development of our cities. He uses GIS as a way to explore questions about the socio-spatial and socio-economic relations of city-regions from the locations of payday loan establishments to mapping the changing geography of manufacturing labor.