Start Date

20-5-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

20-5-2017 1:15 PM

Description

Dillon Mahmoudi will graduate in June 2017 with a PhD in Urban Studies
at Portland State University. He also received his Graduate Certificate in GIS from the Geography department. In the fall of 2017, he will be moving to Baltimore to be Assistant Professor of Geography and Environmental Systems at the University of Maryland Baltimore County where he will teach courses in advanced GIS methods and economic geography. His research and community engagement focuses on critical methods for GIS, bifurcation and deskilling in tech work (software and cartography), geographies of urban inequity, and the intersections of cities and digital technologies.

Comments

This presentation was part of the "The Trouble with Data: Issues in Production, Curation and Access" panel.

Panel description:

Maps tell a story. But whose or what story is being told? Choice of data, the methods and aesthetics selected to convey that data, the defining geographic boundaries, and even the map producer’s biases can each influence the underlying spatial narrative told by a map. In consideration of the current political climate, this panel will critically examine how the spatial narrative is conveyed and what is necessary to ensure that underrepresented people, their struggles and social movements, have a stake in the how their stories are told.

This panel included Veronica Velez and Dillon Mahmoudi, and was moderated by Erin McElroy and Candace Landry.

Veronica Velez' presentation can be found here.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/20640

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May 20th, 1:00 PM May 20th, 1:15 PM

Spatial Narratives in a Post-Truth World

Dillon Mahmoudi will graduate in June 2017 with a PhD in Urban Studies
at Portland State University. He also received his Graduate Certificate in GIS from the Geography department. In the fall of 2017, he will be moving to Baltimore to be Assistant Professor of Geography and Environmental Systems at the University of Maryland Baltimore County where he will teach courses in advanced GIS methods and economic geography. His research and community engagement focuses on critical methods for GIS, bifurcation and deskilling in tech work (software and cartography), geographies of urban inequity, and the intersections of cities and digital technologies.