Start Date

8-5-2013 11:00 AM

Subjects

Deja vu -- Psychological aspects, Memory -- Research, Cognitive psychology, Recollection (Psychology)

Description

Prior research shows that reported frequency of déjà vu declines with age. Memory performance also declines with aging. This study investigated separately a relationship of recollection and familiarity performance with déjà vu frequency, in a sample of college students to control for age. The hypothesis was that there will be a positive correlation between déjà vu frequency and recollection, and there will not be a correlation between familiarity and déjà vu frequency. The Inventory for Déjà Vu Experiences Assessment, a valid and reliable instrument, was used to quantify déjà vu frequency. Recollection and familiarity were quantitated separately by a memory recognition test, using the Opposition Procedure with a Repetition-Lag Paradigm. Sixty-six college students completed the experiment. Criteria for memory performance and comprehension of instructions were established; the analysis included only data of 25 participants who met both criteria. Linear correlation between déjà vu and recollection found r² .3044, r =.5518 using a Pearson correlation coefficient chart (one-tail). With p=0.002 (α = 0.01), significant evidence was found to support a positive correlation between recollection and déjà vu. Familiarity was not significantly correlated with déjà vu frequency. These data are among the first to investigate experimentally the association between memory and déjà vu. They provide evidence that there is a significant correlation between recollection and reported frequency of déjà vu in a healthy sample of college students, and that this association does not exist between familiarity and déjà vu. These findings may further unveil a scientific explanation for déjà vu.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/9581

Share

COinS
 
May 8th, 11:00 AM

Evaluating a Possible Association Between Déjà Vu Frequency and Memory Performance to Explain Déjà Vu

Prior research shows that reported frequency of déjà vu declines with age. Memory performance also declines with aging. This study investigated separately a relationship of recollection and familiarity performance with déjà vu frequency, in a sample of college students to control for age. The hypothesis was that there will be a positive correlation between déjà vu frequency and recollection, and there will not be a correlation between familiarity and déjà vu frequency. The Inventory for Déjà Vu Experiences Assessment, a valid and reliable instrument, was used to quantify déjà vu frequency. Recollection and familiarity were quantitated separately by a memory recognition test, using the Opposition Procedure with a Repetition-Lag Paradigm. Sixty-six college students completed the experiment. Criteria for memory performance and comprehension of instructions were established; the analysis included only data of 25 participants who met both criteria. Linear correlation between déjà vu and recollection found r² .3044, r =.5518 using a Pearson correlation coefficient chart (one-tail). With p=0.002 (α = 0.01), significant evidence was found to support a positive correlation between recollection and déjà vu. Familiarity was not significantly correlated with déjà vu frequency. These data are among the first to investigate experimentally the association between memory and déjà vu. They provide evidence that there is a significant correlation between recollection and reported frequency of déjà vu in a healthy sample of college students, and that this association does not exist between familiarity and déjà vu. These findings may further unveil a scientific explanation for déjà vu.