Start Date

8-5-2013 11:00 AM

Subjects

Archaeological sites -- West (U.S.) -- Protection -- Case studies, Historic sites -- West (U.S.) -- Protection, Indians of North America -- West (U.S.) -- Antiquities -- Law and legislation

Description

Reconciling stewardship and recreational access to public lands is particularly problematic at sites of archaeological and spiritual significance. This poster details the development of a methodology to assess the interpretation of vulnerable archaeological resources on public lands. Using case studies of five existing visitors centers/interpretive areas in the American West, this research uses qualitative and quantitative methods to evaluate different strategies for interpreting landscape, environment, and culture to the visiting public. Case studies include Bandolier National Monument, Mesa Verde National Park, Petroglyph National Monument, Ute Mountain Tribal Park, and Grimes Point Archaeological Site. Areas of investigation include visitorship and visitor satisfaction, the use of signage and landscape design, the presence of traditional ecological knowledge and indigenous history, and the inclusion of cultural demonstrations and performances.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/9427

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May 8th, 11:00 AM

Touring The Ancient West: Archaeological Interpretation in Nuwuvi (Southern Paiute) Homelands

Reconciling stewardship and recreational access to public lands is particularly problematic at sites of archaeological and spiritual significance. This poster details the development of a methodology to assess the interpretation of vulnerable archaeological resources on public lands. Using case studies of five existing visitors centers/interpretive areas in the American West, this research uses qualitative and quantitative methods to evaluate different strategies for interpreting landscape, environment, and culture to the visiting public. Case studies include Bandolier National Monument, Mesa Verde National Park, Petroglyph National Monument, Ute Mountain Tribal Park, and Grimes Point Archaeological Site. Areas of investigation include visitorship and visitor satisfaction, the use of signage and landscape design, the presence of traditional ecological knowledge and indigenous history, and the inclusion of cultural demonstrations and performances.