Start Date

8-5-2013 11:00 AM

Subjects

Prodigiosin -- Pharmacology, Serratia marcescens, Cell-mediated cytotoxicity, Immunosuppressive agents -- Research

Description

Prodigiosins are a family of secondary metabolites that were first isolated from the bacterium Serratia marascens. These natural compounds are red pigmented and characterized by a tri-pyrrole skeleton with a C-4 methoxy group. They have been reported to have good biological properties that include anticancer, antimalarial, antimicrobial and immunosuppressive activities. We have synthesized analogs of the natural prodigiosins (prodiginines) to produce a library of biologically active compounds which have improved biological activity and reduced cytotoxicity in human cells. In this work we studied the interaction between prodiginines and Cu2+ and Zn2+ using UV and Mass Spectroscopy techniques. Early results show that our prodigiosin analogs have good metal binding properties with dissociation constants (Kd) in the micromolar range. Understanding metal binding activities of prodiginines can be key in understanding their pharmacological action. With some drug-metal complexes already in use for the management of conditions such as cancer, diabetes, ulcers and rheumatoid arthritis there's increased interest in this area.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/9460

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May 8th, 11:00 AM

Spectroscopic Studies of Cu2+ and Zn2+ Binding to Prodigiosin Analogs

Prodigiosins are a family of secondary metabolites that were first isolated from the bacterium Serratia marascens. These natural compounds are red pigmented and characterized by a tri-pyrrole skeleton with a C-4 methoxy group. They have been reported to have good biological properties that include anticancer, antimalarial, antimicrobial and immunosuppressive activities. We have synthesized analogs of the natural prodigiosins (prodiginines) to produce a library of biologically active compounds which have improved biological activity and reduced cytotoxicity in human cells. In this work we studied the interaction between prodiginines and Cu2+ and Zn2+ using UV and Mass Spectroscopy techniques. Early results show that our prodigiosin analogs have good metal binding properties with dissociation constants (Kd) in the micromolar range. Understanding metal binding activities of prodiginines can be key in understanding their pharmacological action. With some drug-metal complexes already in use for the management of conditions such as cancer, diabetes, ulcers and rheumatoid arthritis there's increased interest in this area.