Start Date

8-5-2013 12:30 PM

End Date

8-5-2013 2:00 PM

Subjects

Gays in literature, Homosexuality in literature, Children's stories (American) -- History and criticism, Young adult fiction (American) -- History and criticism, Multiculturalism in literature, Cultural pluralism in literature

Description

This research investigates family and social roles in queer children's literature. It provides a thematic analysis of popular titles published during the last decade. It argues that heteronormative and queer-identified protagonists in these stories have identical values concerning family and society. The analysis includes "In Our Mother's House" by Patricia Polacco, "And Tango Makes Three" by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell, "King & King" by Linda de Haan and Stern Nijland, and "Donovan’s Big Day" by Leslea Newman. The analysis focuses on how characters relationships and their commitments to each other such as weddings. It also explores how they take on social roles in order to contribute to their communities. These roles include becoming a king, career professional and even an altar boy. The paper concludes that awareness of the shared values between queer and straight identifying people in North America will lead to greater equality in that both will interpret family and social roles as meaningful expressions that form community.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/9463

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May 8th, 12:30 PM May 8th, 2:00 PM

Family and Social Roles in Queer Children's Literature

This research investigates family and social roles in queer children's literature. It provides a thematic analysis of popular titles published during the last decade. It argues that heteronormative and queer-identified protagonists in these stories have identical values concerning family and society. The analysis includes "In Our Mother's House" by Patricia Polacco, "And Tango Makes Three" by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell, "King & King" by Linda de Haan and Stern Nijland, and "Donovan’s Big Day" by Leslea Newman. The analysis focuses on how characters relationships and their commitments to each other such as weddings. It also explores how they take on social roles in order to contribute to their communities. These roles include becoming a king, career professional and even an altar boy. The paper concludes that awareness of the shared values between queer and straight identifying people in North America will lead to greater equality in that both will interpret family and social roles as meaningful expressions that form community.