Location

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Start Date

12-5-2015 11:00 AM

End Date

12-5-2015 1:00 PM

Subjects

Forensic psychology, Truthfulness and falsehood, Deception

Description

The research study uses a verbal content analysis measure, the Forensic Assessment of Client Truthfulness, derived from the most empirically-supported measures in deception detection (i.e. Criterion-Based Content Analysis and Reality Monitoring). This measure is employed in the study to distinguish between true and false statements in forensic psychological evaluations. The study contains four research conditions including the true and false statements of men accused of sex offenses and of men claiming an insanity defense. Using a repeated measures design, the four statements were rated by 127 university students. Using factor analyses, ANOVA analyses, and t-tests, the results showed that the eight items composing the FACT all significantly differentiate between true and false statements. Further, the FACT is able to differentiate between different types of false statements (i.e. lies of commission and lies of omission) and different types of true statements (i.e. confessions and exculpatory statements). The results also suggest that that truth is a multidimensional construct containing two types of information: statement details (e.g. clarity of detail) and statement quality (e.g. realism). Concluding a statement is true involves a one-step cognitive process in which attributes of truthfulness are present. However, concluding a statement is false involves a two-step cognitive process in which attributes of truthfulness are absent and attributes of untruthfulness are present. This poster describes how to use the FACT, whether informally or as a structured test, as an adjunct to clinical judgment in ascertaining client veracity, a concern in the criminal justice system.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/19819

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May 12th, 11:00 AM May 12th, 1:00 PM

Attributes of True and False Statements of Criminal Defendants

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

The research study uses a verbal content analysis measure, the Forensic Assessment of Client Truthfulness, derived from the most empirically-supported measures in deception detection (i.e. Criterion-Based Content Analysis and Reality Monitoring). This measure is employed in the study to distinguish between true and false statements in forensic psychological evaluations. The study contains four research conditions including the true and false statements of men accused of sex offenses and of men claiming an insanity defense. Using a repeated measures design, the four statements were rated by 127 university students. Using factor analyses, ANOVA analyses, and t-tests, the results showed that the eight items composing the FACT all significantly differentiate between true and false statements. Further, the FACT is able to differentiate between different types of false statements (i.e. lies of commission and lies of omission) and different types of true statements (i.e. confessions and exculpatory statements). The results also suggest that that truth is a multidimensional construct containing two types of information: statement details (e.g. clarity of detail) and statement quality (e.g. realism). Concluding a statement is true involves a one-step cognitive process in which attributes of truthfulness are present. However, concluding a statement is false involves a two-step cognitive process in which attributes of truthfulness are absent and attributes of untruthfulness are present. This poster describes how to use the FACT, whether informally or as a structured test, as an adjunct to clinical judgment in ascertaining client veracity, a concern in the criminal justice system.