Location

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Start Date

12-5-2015 2:45 PM

End Date

12-5-2015 4:15 PM

Subjects

Education -- Aims and objectives -- United States, Education -- Philosophy, Democracy and education -- United States, Education -- Curricula -- Political aspects -- United States

Description

Deeply rooted societal concerns about what role democratic ideals should play within systems of education, and how much sway the federal government should hold over educational institutions, have been at the forefront of American educational policy for decades. These questions have more recently been brought into the limelight once again within the context of the implementation of charter schools and the controversial No Child Left Behind act, and its subsequent failure. The expressed goal of this paper is to provide an examination of what philosophies and ideals of so-called "democratic education" are have played major roles in developing the discourse surrounding, and the implementation of, US federal policy in K-12 education. Through a brief survey of the philosophical writings which have largely informed US policy, an analysis of these writings within the context of the rise of American charter schools and the NCLB, and a reflection on the common problems that such philosophies are fraught with, this paper seeks to provide some hope for transforming future models of American education for the better. Specifically, this study aims at forging a more nuanced understanding of the underlining beliefs that have driven recent educational legislation, and how democratic education has further marginalized low-income and traditionally underrepresented students.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/19813

 
May 12th, 2:45 PM May 12th, 4:15 PM

Freedom from Equality: Democratic Education and the Failure of the NCLB

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Deeply rooted societal concerns about what role democratic ideals should play within systems of education, and how much sway the federal government should hold over educational institutions, have been at the forefront of American educational policy for decades. These questions have more recently been brought into the limelight once again within the context of the implementation of charter schools and the controversial No Child Left Behind act, and its subsequent failure. The expressed goal of this paper is to provide an examination of what philosophies and ideals of so-called "democratic education" are have played major roles in developing the discourse surrounding, and the implementation of, US federal policy in K-12 education. Through a brief survey of the philosophical writings which have largely informed US policy, an analysis of these writings within the context of the rise of American charter schools and the NCLB, and a reflection on the common problems that such philosophies are fraught with, this paper seeks to provide some hope for transforming future models of American education for the better. Specifically, this study aims at forging a more nuanced understanding of the underlining beliefs that have driven recent educational legislation, and how democratic education has further marginalized low-income and traditionally underrepresented students.