Location

Portland State University

Start Date

4-5-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

4-5-2016 2:00 PM

Subjects

Aquifers -- New Jersey, Coastal plains -- New Jersey

Description

Due to the global average increase in temperature over the last 50 years, sea levels have been rising and making coastal aquifers more susceptible to saltwater intrusion. The average rate of sea level rise has increased from 2 mm/year to 3.5 mm/year during the twentieth century. The state of New Jersey is not only densely populated but the development along coastlines makes inundation a potential serious threat. New Jersey is diverse in aquifer types, in addition to the types of water bodies surrounding New Jersey, and makes for an interesting case study for groundwater vulnerability. The EPA has a universal model used to identify potentially contaminated aquifers, the DRASTIC model. This model, however, does not include saltwater intrusion as a potential contaminant and we therefore propose to modify the DRASTIC model in order to address saltwater intrusion as a potential aquifer contaminant, making coastal aquifers more vulnerable to contamination. This study will investigate and compare the aquifer vulnerability mapping ability of the DRASTIC method and a modified DRASTIC method for the state of New Jersey.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/17153

 
May 4th, 12:00 PM May 4th, 2:00 PM

Aquifer Vulnerability Modeling in New Jersey Through the Use of Modified DRASTIC Methodology

Portland State University

Due to the global average increase in temperature over the last 50 years, sea levels have been rising and making coastal aquifers more susceptible to saltwater intrusion. The average rate of sea level rise has increased from 2 mm/year to 3.5 mm/year during the twentieth century. The state of New Jersey is not only densely populated but the development along coastlines makes inundation a potential serious threat. New Jersey is diverse in aquifer types, in addition to the types of water bodies surrounding New Jersey, and makes for an interesting case study for groundwater vulnerability. The EPA has a universal model used to identify potentially contaminated aquifers, the DRASTIC model. This model, however, does not include saltwater intrusion as a potential contaminant and we therefore propose to modify the DRASTIC model in order to address saltwater intrusion as a potential aquifer contaminant, making coastal aquifers more vulnerable to contamination. This study will investigate and compare the aquifer vulnerability mapping ability of the DRASTIC method and a modified DRASTIC method for the state of New Jersey.