Location

Portland State University

Start Date

4-5-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

4-5-2016 2:00 PM

Subjects

Freshwater algae -- Ecology, Aquatic ecology -- Research -- United States, Environmental monitoring -- Pacific Northwest

Description

The purpose of this study is to model how 5-day weather patterns and algal buoyancy regulation influence the competition between two bloom forming cyanobacteria species in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. Sudden changes in weather patterns can quickly impact lake thermal structure, which can rapidly influence the competition between buoyancy regulating cyanobacteria. By modeling competition, I hope to address how altered climate would shift the competitive advantage to toxin forming cyanobacteria. I plan on accomplishing this by coupling a one-dimensional hydrodynamic and algal competition model, with lake specific physiological parameters. A sensitivity test of the model could reveal dramatic shifts in algal competition under future climate change scenarios, which could have implications in how Upper Klamath Lake is managed and how restoration efforts are implemented.

Description

Faculty advisor: John Rueter

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/19829

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May 4th, 12:00 PM May 4th, 2:00 PM

How 5-day Weather Patterns and Buoyancy Regulation Impact Algal Community Assemblage

Portland State University

The purpose of this study is to model how 5-day weather patterns and algal buoyancy regulation influence the competition between two bloom forming cyanobacteria species in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. Sudden changes in weather patterns can quickly impact lake thermal structure, which can rapidly influence the competition between buoyancy regulating cyanobacteria. By modeling competition, I hope to address how altered climate would shift the competitive advantage to toxin forming cyanobacteria. I plan on accomplishing this by coupling a one-dimensional hydrodynamic and algal competition model, with lake specific physiological parameters. A sensitivity test of the model could reveal dramatic shifts in algal competition under future climate change scenarios, which could have implications in how Upper Klamath Lake is managed and how restoration efforts are implemented.