Location

Portland State University

Start Date

4-5-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

4-5-2016 2:00 PM

Subjects

Education -- Philosophy, Teaching

Description

An educator’s teaching philosophy represents their personal beliefs regarding the purpose of classroom instruction and the methods used to facilitate learning. While an individual’s educational philosophy often transforms over time, more research is needed to characterize influences on evolving theory and practice. This survey-based study was conducted to determine if the curricular content has an impact on teaching methodology despite a teacher’s philosophical identification. The study population comprised of adult learner-educators enrolled in a graduate educational philosophy class. The subjects were surveyed after completing a term examining the main tenets of five main educational philosophies (Liberal, Behavioral, Progressive, Humanist, Radical). Using an in-person, web-based survey tool, the subjects reviewed situational prompts and answered multiple choice questions representing philosophical identification and specific curriculum-based approaches. While most subjects identified with progressive (40%) and radical theories (40%), their in-practice lesson plans did not mirror their self-identified beliefs. When given scenarios involving various curricula (anatomy, ethics, and foreign language), methodological approaches differed from the anticipated philosophical identifications every time. While the data set is too small to draw definitive conclusions, the study supports trends toward a correlation between curriculum content and philosophical methodology. Further investigation into situational and curricular impacts on educational philosophy identification is needed.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/17156

 
May 4th, 12:00 PM May 4th, 2:00 PM

Curriculum Impact on Educational Philosophy Identification

Portland State University

An educator’s teaching philosophy represents their personal beliefs regarding the purpose of classroom instruction and the methods used to facilitate learning. While an individual’s educational philosophy often transforms over time, more research is needed to characterize influences on evolving theory and practice. This survey-based study was conducted to determine if the curricular content has an impact on teaching methodology despite a teacher’s philosophical identification. The study population comprised of adult learner-educators enrolled in a graduate educational philosophy class. The subjects were surveyed after completing a term examining the main tenets of five main educational philosophies (Liberal, Behavioral, Progressive, Humanist, Radical). Using an in-person, web-based survey tool, the subjects reviewed situational prompts and answered multiple choice questions representing philosophical identification and specific curriculum-based approaches. While most subjects identified with progressive (40%) and radical theories (40%), their in-practice lesson plans did not mirror their self-identified beliefs. When given scenarios involving various curricula (anatomy, ethics, and foreign language), methodological approaches differed from the anticipated philosophical identifications every time. While the data set is too small to draw definitive conclusions, the study supports trends toward a correlation between curriculum content and philosophical methodology. Further investigation into situational and curricular impacts on educational philosophy identification is needed.