Location

Portland State University

Start Date

4-5-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

4-5-2016 2:00 AM

Subjects

Homelessness -- Oregon -- Portland, Homelessness -- Social aspects, Improving homeless services

Description

Homelessness remains a pressing concern in Portland. The homeless-to-housed transition requires more than access to shelter: some individuals have trouble adapting to the change in social contact that accompanies solitary living (indoors); others may face difficulty setting boundaries associated with property (e.g., endangering their lease by having too many guests) or other community-living norms. This study used photovoice, a community-based participatory research method, to explore the dynamics experienced by homelessness survivors.

A total of 13 participants were recruited through HEARTH, a research collaborative including researchers from OHSU, PSU, and NCNM along with staff, consumers, and volunteers at Central City Concern, a local agency that provides housing and social services. Participants received photovoice training and collectively took over 500 photographs. Eleven participant presented five photographs and discussed their meaning and significance, Group members described reactions and interpretations of the photographs. The group then selected 50 photographs to include in an upcoming exhibit and placed them into categories of “Street”, “Getting There,” and “Home.” Subcategories were then identified. For example, one subcategory was “waystations” such as the public library or McDonalds. Other subcategories described instrumental activities, but also feelings such as hope and resilience derived from nature and urban scenery.

Individuals became homeless for different reasons. Photovoice revealed that, once homeless, these individuals used creative survival skills that colored their experience(s) and distinguished them from the stereotypical homeless person. This poster will document findings of this project and provide suggestions for future photovoice projects with members of marginalized communities.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/17157

Share

COinS
 
May 4th, 12:00 PM May 4th, 2:00 AM

From Street to Home: Using Photovoice to Better Understand Homelessness in Portland

Portland State University

Homelessness remains a pressing concern in Portland. The homeless-to-housed transition requires more than access to shelter: some individuals have trouble adapting to the change in social contact that accompanies solitary living (indoors); others may face difficulty setting boundaries associated with property (e.g., endangering their lease by having too many guests) or other community-living norms. This study used photovoice, a community-based participatory research method, to explore the dynamics experienced by homelessness survivors.

A total of 13 participants were recruited through HEARTH, a research collaborative including researchers from OHSU, PSU, and NCNM along with staff, consumers, and volunteers at Central City Concern, a local agency that provides housing and social services. Participants received photovoice training and collectively took over 500 photographs. Eleven participant presented five photographs and discussed their meaning and significance, Group members described reactions and interpretations of the photographs. The group then selected 50 photographs to include in an upcoming exhibit and placed them into categories of “Street”, “Getting There,” and “Home.” Subcategories were then identified. For example, one subcategory was “waystations” such as the public library or McDonalds. Other subcategories described instrumental activities, but also feelings such as hope and resilience derived from nature and urban scenery.

Individuals became homeless for different reasons. Photovoice revealed that, once homeless, these individuals used creative survival skills that colored their experience(s) and distinguished them from the stereotypical homeless person. This poster will document findings of this project and provide suggestions for future photovoice projects with members of marginalized communities.