Location

Portland State University

Start Date

4-5-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

4-5-2016 3:00 PM

Subjects

Rome -- History, Rome -- Social life and customs

Description

This paper argues for a profound link between gendered stereotypes and geography in the Graeco-Roman imagination focusing on the early Roman Empire. Hitherto, this link has been mentioned, sometimes assumed, and almost never treated as a venture worthy or deeper study or unifying themes, apart from questions of “proto-racism.” Notwithstanding, the links can be drawn comparing how the peoples living in different parts of the empire are described and how stereotypes of gender also appear in historical and literary texts. By careful examination (including cross-examination) of Strabo, Tacitus, Livy, Julius Caesar, and others, I seek the argue for a strong East/West, North/South divide in Roman minds and for a paradoxical self-view by the Italic Romans and that these cardinal directions were often imbued with gendered conceptions of manliness and effeminacy, softness and ruggedness, as well as tameness, and warlike tendencies.

Description

Faculty advisor: Brian Turner

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/19828

Share

COinS
 
May 4th, 1:30 PM May 4th, 3:00 PM

Geography of Gender and the Gender of Geography in the Roman Imagination

Portland State University

This paper argues for a profound link between gendered stereotypes and geography in the Graeco-Roman imagination focusing on the early Roman Empire. Hitherto, this link has been mentioned, sometimes assumed, and almost never treated as a venture worthy or deeper study or unifying themes, apart from questions of “proto-racism.” Notwithstanding, the links can be drawn comparing how the peoples living in different parts of the empire are described and how stereotypes of gender also appear in historical and literary texts. By careful examination (including cross-examination) of Strabo, Tacitus, Livy, Julius Caesar, and others, I seek the argue for a strong East/West, North/South divide in Roman minds and for a paradoxical self-view by the Italic Romans and that these cardinal directions were often imbued with gendered conceptions of manliness and effeminacy, softness and ruggedness, as well as tameness, and warlike tendencies.