Start Date

10-5-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

10-5-2017 11:00 AM

Subjects

Stereotypes (Social psychology) -- Social aspects, Stereotypes (Social psychology) -- Origins, Social interaction -- Analysis, Prejudices, Social groups

Description

Fiske, Cuddy, Glick, and Xu’s (2002) stereotype content model (SCM) has emerged as one of the most influential models of person perception in contemporary scholarship, and the organizational literature has begun to use this model for diversity management (Lyons et al., 2016; Martinez, White, Shapiro, & Hebl, 2016). However, data we have collected indicate that this two-factor solution may not be sufficient for all groups. Furthermore, the factor structure of the SCM items has never been examined empirically. The construct of morality, though largely ignored in contemporary Western psychology, has been proven to be the most important basis on which people evaluate themselves and others, and has been shown to determine the meaning and magnitude of every other evaluative characteristic (MacIntyre, 1984; Osgood, Suci, & Tannenbaum, 1957; Schweder, Much, Mahapatra, & Park, 1997). Thus, across two studies and using eight different target groups (cancer survivors, disabled individuals, atheists, ex-convicts, Whites, Asians, poor individuals, elderly individuals), we introduce perceived morality as a third potential construct and find that models that include this third construct are superior to models in which it is excluded. These findings suggest that morality is a separate construct from the SCM’s warmth and competence and that these three factors may better capture stereotype content of stigmatized groups.

Authors: Lauren S. Park, Larry R. Martinez

Presenter: Lauren S. Park

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/20023

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May 10th, 9:00 AM May 10th, 11:00 AM

Expanding Stereotype Content Beyond Warmth and Competence

Fiske, Cuddy, Glick, and Xu’s (2002) stereotype content model (SCM) has emerged as one of the most influential models of person perception in contemporary scholarship, and the organizational literature has begun to use this model for diversity management (Lyons et al., 2016; Martinez, White, Shapiro, & Hebl, 2016). However, data we have collected indicate that this two-factor solution may not be sufficient for all groups. Furthermore, the factor structure of the SCM items has never been examined empirically. The construct of morality, though largely ignored in contemporary Western psychology, has been proven to be the most important basis on which people evaluate themselves and others, and has been shown to determine the meaning and magnitude of every other evaluative characteristic (MacIntyre, 1984; Osgood, Suci, & Tannenbaum, 1957; Schweder, Much, Mahapatra, & Park, 1997). Thus, across two studies and using eight different target groups (cancer survivors, disabled individuals, atheists, ex-convicts, Whites, Asians, poor individuals, elderly individuals), we introduce perceived morality as a third potential construct and find that models that include this third construct are superior to models in which it is excluded. These findings suggest that morality is a separate construct from the SCM’s warmth and competence and that these three factors may better capture stereotype content of stigmatized groups.

Authors: Lauren S. Park, Larry R. Martinez

Presenter: Lauren S. Park