Start Date

10-5-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

10-5-2017 3:00 PM

Subjects

Nanostructured materials, Drug delivery systems, Nanomedicine, Nanoparticles

Description

Exploring the inhibiting factors of silver nanoparticles could change the way we approach drug-resistant viruses. In previous research, silver nanoparticles have shown to physically block viruses, such as HIV-1, from infecting its host by theoretically binding to surface receptors on the virus. Since there is little research done in this area, we have decided to combine silver nanoparticles with a virus that thrives within an extreme environment: the Spindle Shaped virus. By combining these two factors, we could reveal the biological and chemical properties that block the virus from infecting its host, Sulfolobus. Currently, we have collected data that shows that there is a decrease in the infectability of the spindle shaped virus when it is combined with the silver nanoparticles, but the exact reason is not yet known. Different factors are being explored, such as which size or shape of the nanoparticles inhibits infectability the most, and the length in exposure of the virus to the nanoparticles. Finding the exact ways that these silver nanoparticles interact with unique virus, such as the Spindle Shaped virus, could potentially open up new ways that we could combat life-threatening viruses.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/20063

Share

COinS
 
May 10th, 1:00 PM May 10th, 3:00 PM

Inhibiting Infectivity of the Spindle Shaped Virus Using Silver Nanoparticles

Exploring the inhibiting factors of silver nanoparticles could change the way we approach drug-resistant viruses. In previous research, silver nanoparticles have shown to physically block viruses, such as HIV-1, from infecting its host by theoretically binding to surface receptors on the virus. Since there is little research done in this area, we have decided to combine silver nanoparticles with a virus that thrives within an extreme environment: the Spindle Shaped virus. By combining these two factors, we could reveal the biological and chemical properties that block the virus from infecting its host, Sulfolobus. Currently, we have collected data that shows that there is a decrease in the infectability of the spindle shaped virus when it is combined with the silver nanoparticles, but the exact reason is not yet known. Different factors are being explored, such as which size or shape of the nanoparticles inhibits infectability the most, and the length in exposure of the virus to the nanoparticles. Finding the exact ways that these silver nanoparticles interact with unique virus, such as the Spindle Shaped virus, could potentially open up new ways that we could combat life-threatening viruses.