Start Date

10-5-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

10-5-2017 1:00 PM

Subjects

Red alder -- Ecology -- Oregon, Endophytes -- Environmental aspects, Symbiosis, Frankia -- Effect on red alder

Description

Red alders (Alnus rubra) of the Pacific Northwest are characterized as actinorhizal dicotyledons; plants that possess that ability to form symbiotic relationships with endophytic organisms, which result in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In Alders of the order Fagales, such a symbiotic relationship with Frankia bacteria allows these plants to play crucial environmental roles as pioneer species able to colonize and enrich nutrient-deficient soils. This ability has a major impact on ecological succession by enabling other species to establish. Although inoculation with frankia bacteria is known to increase symbiotic nitrogen fixation capabilities of actinorhizal plants, whether they could confer the same benefit to other host species is unstudied. Additionally, whether diversity of endophytic communities varies between host plants of the same species is unknown. The research conducted contributes to a larger-scale research project that asks: How do foliar endophyte communities in alder and willow respond to heavy-metal air pollution in an urban environment? Whereas the smaller-scale project specifically address the diversity of foliar and nodular endophytic communities present within A. rubra inhabiting three distinct areas that are also represented in the larger-scale project. Secondary research will also be performed to characterize frankia bacteria diversity present in Alder root nodules. The significance of this study is to explore differences in foliar and nodular endophyte community assemblages expressed between three spatially distinct locations.

Authors: Sebastian L. Singleton, Daniel Ballhorn

Presenter: Sebastian L. Singleton

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/20073

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May 10th, 11:00 AM May 10th, 1:00 PM

Effect of Spatial Influence on Endophyte Diversity Within Alnus Rubra

Red alders (Alnus rubra) of the Pacific Northwest are characterized as actinorhizal dicotyledons; plants that possess that ability to form symbiotic relationships with endophytic organisms, which result in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In Alders of the order Fagales, such a symbiotic relationship with Frankia bacteria allows these plants to play crucial environmental roles as pioneer species able to colonize and enrich nutrient-deficient soils. This ability has a major impact on ecological succession by enabling other species to establish. Although inoculation with frankia bacteria is known to increase symbiotic nitrogen fixation capabilities of actinorhizal plants, whether they could confer the same benefit to other host species is unstudied. Additionally, whether diversity of endophytic communities varies between host plants of the same species is unknown. The research conducted contributes to a larger-scale research project that asks: How do foliar endophyte communities in alder and willow respond to heavy-metal air pollution in an urban environment? Whereas the smaller-scale project specifically address the diversity of foliar and nodular endophytic communities present within A. rubra inhabiting three distinct areas that are also represented in the larger-scale project. Secondary research will also be performed to characterize frankia bacteria diversity present in Alder root nodules. The significance of this study is to explore differences in foliar and nodular endophyte community assemblages expressed between three spatially distinct locations.

Authors: Sebastian L. Singleton, Daniel Ballhorn

Presenter: Sebastian L. Singleton