Start Date

10-5-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

10-5-2017 1:00 PM

Subjects

Molokai (Hawaii) -- Environmental conditions, Conservation of natural resources -- Hawaii -- Molokai, Biological invasions -- Hawaii, Mangrove ecology -- Hawaii

Description

Invasive species are recognized as a leading threat to ecosystems and their management is expensive, time consuming, and labor intensive. Therefore, it is important to review both benefits and detriments of the species to inform appropriate management decisions. Red mangrove was introduced to Moloka'i, Hawaii in 1902 to mitigate the effects of soil erosion and has since spread along the coast and to adjacent islands creating novel habitat. This study assessed both biological services and social attitudes towards Moloka'i's non-native mangroves to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the species. Zooplankton community structure was examined in mangrove and non-mangrove sites and found to be different depending on the amount of mangroves present. Surveys of Moloka'i residents revealed no majority attitude towards mangroves nor support for complete eradication but residents were highly supportive of active management. Approaching other novel ecosystems created by established non-native species from a socio-ecological view may become more crucial as changes in climate, demographics, and environmental conditions further complicate effects. In our globalized world, non-native species introductions will continue to have both positive and negative effects that vary over time. Therefore, assessment of both social and ecological perspectives may lead to more effective management with greater community support.

Description

This poster was also presented at the ESM Colloquium at Portland State University on May 17, 2017.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/20083

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May 10th, 11:00 AM May 10th, 1:00 PM

Non-native Mangroves of Moloka'i, Hawai'i: A Socio-ecological Analysis

Invasive species are recognized as a leading threat to ecosystems and their management is expensive, time consuming, and labor intensive. Therefore, it is important to review both benefits and detriments of the species to inform appropriate management decisions. Red mangrove was introduced to Moloka'i, Hawaii in 1902 to mitigate the effects of soil erosion and has since spread along the coast and to adjacent islands creating novel habitat. This study assessed both biological services and social attitudes towards Moloka'i's non-native mangroves to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the species. Zooplankton community structure was examined in mangrove and non-mangrove sites and found to be different depending on the amount of mangroves present. Surveys of Moloka'i residents revealed no majority attitude towards mangroves nor support for complete eradication but residents were highly supportive of active management. Approaching other novel ecosystems created by established non-native species from a socio-ecological view may become more crucial as changes in climate, demographics, and environmental conditions further complicate effects. In our globalized world, non-native species introductions will continue to have both positive and negative effects that vary over time. Therefore, assessment of both social and ecological perspectives may lead to more effective management with greater community support.