Start Date

10-5-2017 11:00 AM

End Date

10-5-2017 1:00 PM

Subjects

Developmental disabilities -- Social aspects, Health care services -- Women, Developmentally disabled -- Services for -- Oregon, Mothers of children with disabilities

Description

Background: Children in racial/ethnic minority and low-income families are more likely to experience low rates of early developmental disability (DD) diagnosis. Racial/ethnic and language differences in parent information about DDs could contribute to diagnostic delays, but little is known about differences in parent DD familiarity.

Objectives: To assess DD knowledge and information in a sample of low-income families.

Methods: We conducted a self-administered survey on 539 parents attending their child’s appointment at the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in six Oregon counties. Survey items assessed familiarity with early signs of DDs, self-reported knowledge about DDs, and having a friend or family member with ASD. Bivariable and multivariable analyses assessed differences in outcomes for following ethnicity/language groups: non-Latino white [white], Latino-English proficient [Latino-EP], Latino-limited English proficient [Latino-LEP], and non-Latino other race English proficient [other race].

Results: Overall, participants correctly identified 64.7% of early signs of DDs. White participants correctly identified the most signs after adjustment for socio-demographic differences. Latino-LEP and other race participants more likely to have never heard of several prevalent DDs, and were also less likely to have a friend or family member with a DD compared to white families.

Conclusions: Low-income parents, particularly Latino-LEP and other race parents, have relatively little familiarity or personal experience with DDs, and are less aware of DD early signs. Study findings suggest that interventions to reduce disparities in DD diagnosis and treatment should include increasing information transfer to parents in low-income and racial/ethnic minority communities.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/20175

 
May 10th, 11:00 AM May 10th, 1:00 PM

Evaluating Knowledge of Developmental Disabilities Among WIC Participants

Background: Children in racial/ethnic minority and low-income families are more likely to experience low rates of early developmental disability (DD) diagnosis. Racial/ethnic and language differences in parent information about DDs could contribute to diagnostic delays, but little is known about differences in parent DD familiarity.

Objectives: To assess DD knowledge and information in a sample of low-income families.

Methods: We conducted a self-administered survey on 539 parents attending their child’s appointment at the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in six Oregon counties. Survey items assessed familiarity with early signs of DDs, self-reported knowledge about DDs, and having a friend or family member with ASD. Bivariable and multivariable analyses assessed differences in outcomes for following ethnicity/language groups: non-Latino white [white], Latino-English proficient [Latino-EP], Latino-limited English proficient [Latino-LEP], and non-Latino other race English proficient [other race].

Results: Overall, participants correctly identified 64.7% of early signs of DDs. White participants correctly identified the most signs after adjustment for socio-demographic differences. Latino-LEP and other race participants more likely to have never heard of several prevalent DDs, and were also less likely to have a friend or family member with a DD compared to white families.

Conclusions: Low-income parents, particularly Latino-LEP and other race parents, have relatively little familiarity or personal experience with DDs, and are less aware of DD early signs. Study findings suggest that interventions to reduce disparities in DD diagnosis and treatment should include increasing information transfer to parents in low-income and racial/ethnic minority communities.