test1

Sean N. Gordon, Portland State University

Abstract

Feedback between biophysical and socioeconomic systems is recognized as a critical piece in a number of current integrative research frameworks. However, little has been studied about such feedbacks in urban areas, which are important in terms of their fraction of resource use as well as the larger potential cognitive disconnect due to both spatial and technological removal from their resource impacts. This study interviewed 11 government employees involved in water quality management from 4 jurisdictions in the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area: Clark County, WA; City of Vancouver, WA; Oregon Metro; and City of Portland, OR. The focus of the interview analysis was to understand how and why water quality information is collected and how it is used in governance. Feedback from the environment to social system is occurring in the management of local water resources in a number of forms. Federal laws are high level drivers of these monitoring efforts, but they are disjointed and have led to collection of information that is often not seen as useful for local management. The City of Portland is trying a more integrative watershed health index. Both sides of the river have improved both point and nonpoint pollution controls since the 1990's, in response to federal and state mandates; however, it appears unclear whether regular progress towards water quality goals can continue to be made given local resistance to further regulation. The City of Portland is trying a more integrative watershed health index. Both sides of the river have improved both point and nonpoint pollution controls since the 1990's, in response to federal and state mandates; however, it appears unclear whether regular progress towards water quality goals can continue to be made given local resistance to further regulation.

 

test1

Feedback between biophysical and socioeconomic systems is recognized as a critical piece in a number of current integrative research frameworks. However, little has been studied about such feedbacks in urban areas, which are important in terms of their fraction of resource use as well as the larger potential cognitive disconnect due to both spatial and technological removal from their resource impacts. This study interviewed 11 government employees involved in water quality management from 4 jurisdictions in the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area: Clark County, WA; City of Vancouver, WA; Oregon Metro; and City of Portland, OR. The focus of the interview analysis was to understand how and why water quality information is collected and how it is used in governance. Feedback from the environment to social system is occurring in the management of local water resources in a number of forms. Federal laws are high level drivers of these monitoring efforts, but they are disjointed and have led to collection of information that is often not seen as useful for local management. The City of Portland is trying a more integrative watershed health index. Both sides of the river have improved both point and nonpoint pollution controls since the 1990's, in response to federal and state mandates; however, it appears unclear whether regular progress towards water quality goals can continue to be made given local resistance to further regulation. The City of Portland is trying a more integrative watershed health index. Both sides of the river have improved both point and nonpoint pollution controls since the 1990's, in response to federal and state mandates; however, it appears unclear whether regular progress towards water quality goals can continue to be made given local resistance to further regulation.