Start Date

5-2011 9:00 AM

End Date

5-2011 10:00 AM

Subjects

Human dissection -- Moral and ethical aspects, Human dissection -- Italy -- History, Religion and science -- History

Description

The mystical element of the human cadaver has long determined how people interact with it. Ancient cultures often feared the wrath of a higher power arising from an investigation into the sanctity of the human corpse, a fear that for the most part stemmed from religious traditions. Despite the taboos associated with this practice, the dawn of the Italian Renaissance saw a gradual shift in this traditional perspective that allowed for scholars, particularly those in Northern Italy, to explore the subject of anatomy with greater freedom. This paper explores the factors that contributed to the proliferation of anatomical dissection throughout the Italian medical field, and the accompanying acceptance of the cadavers as an important component in understanding the body’s functions.

Description

Winner of the Karen E. Hoppes Young Historians Award for Outstanding Research and Writing.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/12397

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May 1st, 9:00 AM May 1st, 10:00 AM

The Anatomical Renaissance

The mystical element of the human cadaver has long determined how people interact with it. Ancient cultures often feared the wrath of a higher power arising from an investigation into the sanctity of the human corpse, a fear that for the most part stemmed from religious traditions. Despite the taboos associated with this practice, the dawn of the Italian Renaissance saw a gradual shift in this traditional perspective that allowed for scholars, particularly those in Northern Italy, to explore the subject of anatomy with greater freedom. This paper explores the factors that contributed to the proliferation of anatomical dissection throughout the Italian medical field, and the accompanying acceptance of the cadavers as an important component in understanding the body’s functions.