Presenter Information

Avery Fischer, Lakeridge High School

Start Date

26-4-2012 1:00 PM

End Date

26-4-2012 2:15 PM

Description

How we see our enemy is essential to understating the policies and decisions made during Wartime. How one paints the enemy is the most important part to understanding why certain choices were made. During WWII, America and Japan were enemies – how did they paint each other? And more importantly, how did they show it to their people? This paper focuses on film during WWII, from Japan and America to answer these essential questions.

Description

Winner of the Karen E. Hoppes Young Historians Award for Outstanding Research and Writing.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/9645

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Apr 26th, 1:00 PM Apr 26th, 2:15 PM

Painting the Enemy in Motion: Film from both sides of the Pacific War

How we see our enemy is essential to understating the policies and decisions made during Wartime. How one paints the enemy is the most important part to understanding why certain choices were made. During WWII, America and Japan were enemies – how did they paint each other? And more importantly, how did they show it to their people? This paper focuses on film during WWII, from Japan and America to answer these essential questions.