Start Date

28-4-2015 1:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2015 2:15 PM

Subjects

Rome -- History, Rome -- History -- Republic (265-30 B.C.), Celtic Civilization, Celts

Description

The rise of the Roman Empire created not only a military but also a cultural hegemony over colonized populations. While this interaction is often portrayed as a primarily unidirectional process of cultural assimilation, this may not be the case for Celtic peoples following their colonization in the mid first century BC. An examination of Roman perception of Celtic culture, perceived compatibility of Celtic culture, and mixed Romano-Celtic culture indicates that the cultural exchange between Romans and Celts was bi-directional.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/15226

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Apr 28th, 1:00 PM Apr 28th, 2:15 PM

Celtic Romanization: Cultural Assimilation or Cultural Exchange?

The rise of the Roman Empire created not only a military but also a cultural hegemony over colonized populations. While this interaction is often portrayed as a primarily unidirectional process of cultural assimilation, this may not be the case for Celtic peoples following their colonization in the mid first century BC. An examination of Roman perception of Celtic culture, perceived compatibility of Celtic culture, and mixed Romano-Celtic culture indicates that the cultural exchange between Romans and Celts was bi-directional.