Start Date

20-4-2017 12:45 PM

End Date

20-4-2017 2:00 PM

Subjects

Karl Marx (1818-1883). Manifest der Kommunistischen Partei. English -- Criticism and interpretation, Social classes -- Russia -- History

Description

Karl Marx is among the few historical figures whose influence was not fully apparent until after his death. When he penned his best-known work, The Communist Manifesto, “communism” was little more than a vague boogeyman employed by the political establishment of Europe to discredit movements among industrial laborers, but after he had long since passed, the students of his works, in the midst of World War I, seized power from the Tsar of Russia. Why the revolution occurred but the expected workers’ paradise failed to follow has been the subject of much debate. Opinions range from the White Russian view that toppling the Empire had been a mistake from the start to the neo-Bolshevik perspective that only western capitalist imperialism kept the red banner from flying over the whole world. By analyzing the underdeveloped and disorderly nature of World War I-era Russia through its disproportionately agricultural populace, the political chaos prompted by the fall of the Tsar, and the need for the Bolsheviks to support a modern war machine to maintain a hold on power, researchers see an image of a Russian Revolution that was held back not by the nature of the revolution, but by the nature of Russia.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/19794

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Apr 20th, 12:45 PM Apr 20th, 2:00 PM

The Communist Manifesto: A Case Study in the Class Politics of Industrialization

Karl Marx is among the few historical figures whose influence was not fully apparent until after his death. When he penned his best-known work, The Communist Manifesto, “communism” was little more than a vague boogeyman employed by the political establishment of Europe to discredit movements among industrial laborers, but after he had long since passed, the students of his works, in the midst of World War I, seized power from the Tsar of Russia. Why the revolution occurred but the expected workers’ paradise failed to follow has been the subject of much debate. Opinions range from the White Russian view that toppling the Empire had been a mistake from the start to the neo-Bolshevik perspective that only western capitalist imperialism kept the red banner from flying over the whole world. By analyzing the underdeveloped and disorderly nature of World War I-era Russia through its disproportionately agricultural populace, the political chaos prompted by the fall of the Tsar, and the need for the Bolsheviks to support a modern war machine to maintain a hold on power, researchers see an image of a Russian Revolution that was held back not by the nature of the revolution, but by the nature of Russia.