First Advisor

Hyeyoung Woo

Date of Award

Winter 3-2022

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Science and University Honors

Department

Science

Language

English

Subjects

stress, stress relief, houseless, homeless, preventative care, chronic stress

Abstract

When the word "stress" is mentioned to lay people, they might think that their definitions of "stress" would be the same or similar. However, stress may vary by, not only degrees of the adverse circumstances, but also kinds of stressors which make an individual's experience of stress and their coping mechanisms complicated. Stress refers to a state of mental strain or tension resulting from adverse circumstances. Each individual living in society undergoes stress as a part of life. To some degree, stress keeps us motivated to stay alive in this way through survival instincts. However, excess stress may cause chaos for the system in which it affects. In order to lower risk of chronic health problems through the reduction of overall stress, stress relief methods can be deemed a valuable source of preventative health maintenance. This thesis begins by addressing the efficacy of common stress relief methods for general adult, healthy populations. Then, the focus will be pivoted towards houseless individuals living in urban settings in order to explore more efficient stress relief methods with consideration of accessibility from a financial, physical, and safety perspective. With completion of this stage of research, this thesis presents evidence that access to green space provided an effective and accessible method of relieving stress for houseless individuals in urban areas.

Rights

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/37199

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