Date of Award

6-2-2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Psychology and University Honors

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Kerth O'Brien

Subjects

Vigilance (Psychology), Sleep, African Americans -- Health and hygiene, Stress (Physiology), Race discrimination

DOI

10.15760/honors.424

Abstract

The present study focuses on racial discrimination, sleep, and vigilance from Wave 5 of the Americans' Changing Lives study. From previous literature we know that stress and sleep are related; the more stress present, the more sleeping problems. It follows then that if anticipation of discrimination (vigilance) is the manifestation of stress related to racism, then vigilant individuals will have a harder time sleeping. Our hypothesis is that Black Americans’ vigilance levels will be negatively correlated with their sleep quality such that lower vigilance levels will indicate higher sleep quality. The results supported our hypothesis suggesting that Black Americans who experience vigilance also have a harder time falling asleep.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/20430

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