Date of Award

2-27-2019

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Anthropology and University Honors

Department

Anthropology

First Advisor

Sarah Sterling

Subjects

Obsidian mines and mining -- Mexico, Obsidian mines and mining -- Guatemala, Obsidian implements -- Mexico, Obsidian implements -- Guatemala, Mayas -- Material culture

DOI

10.15760/honors.672

Abstract

Obsidian was an important resource throughout Mesoamerica, and found at nearly all sites. Sources of obsidian were located in the Mexican Highlands and Guatemalan Highlands, often being transported over hundreds of kilometers for distribution. In this paper I chose four Maya sites—El Ceibal, Tikal, Xtobo, and Actun Uayazba Kab—and used three obsidian distribution models previously published by De León et al. in 2009, to infer possible distribution methods used in the Maya Lowlands. Though limitations existed the results from this proof-of-concept analysis indicate that distribution models derived for central Mexican contexts are suitable for Maya regions, and that the Maya were engaged in multiple forms of blade trade depending on location.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/27956

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