First Advisor

Sherrie Campbell

Date of Award

Summer 2020

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Psychology and University Honors

Department

Psychology

Language

English

DOI

10.15760/honors.975

Abstract

A child’s foundational emotional proficiency is highly predictive of their academic success. It is therefore imperative that center-based, federally funded, public childhood education systems provide their students with a curriculum that facilitates the development of a strong socio-emotional baseline on which to build their cognitive, academic abilities. Drawing on government reports by the US Department of Education and empirical publications from an academic perspective, this paper reviews the nature of current efforts to reform the childhood education system, as seen through the implementation of the common core standards of learning. I review the quality of education that is provided by curricula which involve these common core standards, and criticize the many faults that largely contribute to the academic achievement gap. This literature review indicates that directly addressing the risk factors which have frequent detrimental effects on childhood social and emotional development is the most effective way to improve overall academic success in the United States. This paper encourages the implementation of SEL in public academic settings in effort to provide children with a strong baseline of social and emotional skill which will structure their academic success as well as advise them through the trials of self-regulation in adolescence and support competency in adulthood.

Rights

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/34544

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