Location

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Start Date

24-7-2014 3:15 PM

End Date

24-7-2014 3:35 PM

Subjects

Information literacy -- Study and teaching, Library instruction

Description

Instruction librarians often recommend assignments such as reflective essays and research diaries to encourage metacognition about the research process. In an effort to introduce students to the practice of metacognition in a fun and engaging way, two instruction librarians created a graphical narrative assignment for freshmen, using comics software called Comic Life. The presenters will share the metacognition rubric they developed to assess and compare student research comics with reflective essays assigned in previous semesters. Finally, presenters will share the results of their analysis comparing rubric scores for significant differences between the two instruction methods. While the graphical narrative assignment relies on multiple sessions with students, a simpler version of a visual narrative could be integrated into an orientation session or a one-shot session. This presentation will include several suggestions for incorporating graphical narratives into a variety of instructional scenarios.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/14492

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Jul 24th, 3:15 PM Jul 24th, 3:35 PM

Comics in Class: Assessing Metacognition in Graphical Research Narratives

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Instruction librarians often recommend assignments such as reflective essays and research diaries to encourage metacognition about the research process. In an effort to introduce students to the practice of metacognition in a fun and engaging way, two instruction librarians created a graphical narrative assignment for freshmen, using comics software called Comic Life. The presenters will share the metacognition rubric they developed to assess and compare student research comics with reflective essays assigned in previous semesters. Finally, presenters will share the results of their analysis comparing rubric scores for significant differences between the two instruction methods. While the graphical narrative assignment relies on multiple sessions with students, a simpler version of a visual narrative could be integrated into an orientation session or a one-shot session. This presentation will include several suggestions for incorporating graphical narratives into a variety of instructional scenarios.