Title

They're Fun, But Are They Sustainable? Assessing Games-Based Learning in Instruction

Location

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Start Date

25-7-2014 1:55 PM

End Date

25-7-2014 2:15 PM

Subjects

Information literacy -- Study and teaching, Library instruction, Simulation games in education

Description

The popularity of using games for information literacy instruction (ILI) has grown rapidly in recent years, but much evaluation beyond student interest has yet to be explored. This presentation shares the implementation and assessment of games-based learning in English Composition classes at a large urban university, providing insight into whether incorporating games into ILI is a truly sustainable practice.

Online games focusing on developing keywords and identifying citations were played in one presenter’s section of classes, while additional time for a self-directed activity was allotted for in the second presenter’s classes. Students in all classes completed pre- and post-tests for the presenters to determine how much each group learned. Session attendees will learn how to conduct a similar assessment. Does playing online games result in increased learning? Did students who do not play games score lower on the tests? What are the implications for your own instruction?

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/14553

 
Jul 25th, 1:55 PM Jul 25th, 2:15 PM

They're Fun, But Are They Sustainable? Assessing Games-Based Learning in Instruction

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

The popularity of using games for information literacy instruction (ILI) has grown rapidly in recent years, but much evaluation beyond student interest has yet to be explored. This presentation shares the implementation and assessment of games-based learning in English Composition classes at a large urban university, providing insight into whether incorporating games into ILI is a truly sustainable practice.

Online games focusing on developing keywords and identifying citations were played in one presenter’s section of classes, while additional time for a self-directed activity was allotted for in the second presenter’s classes. Students in all classes completed pre- and post-tests for the presenters to determine how much each group learned. Session attendees will learn how to conduct a similar assessment. Does playing online games result in increased learning? Did students who do not play games score lower on the tests? What are the implications for your own instruction?