Title

Challenging Narratives: The Implications of being perceived as an Agent of Development within the Filipinx Community

Date

12-8-2020 11:55 AM

Abstract

The aim of this research were threefold: (a) to explore the perceptions of migrant workers from the Philippines and their working conditions; (b) to assess the relationship between the effects of migrant work, transnational and diasporic families, and mental health; and (c) to examine how the trauma experienced as a product of migrant work becomes intergenerational. As those within the greater Filipinx community are labeled as "agents of development," it directly impacts the workers involved by masking the exploitation, harassment, and violence they may go through finding work overseas. In particular, this study will look into examining the factors that administer this population vulnerable to exploitation, paying attention to gendered dynamics and power relations. Conducted through a qualitative study, this research will be deeply rooted in storytelling through anonymous interview surveys, following the transmission of mental health implications across multigenerational families. The hope is to highlight and underscore the personal and lived experiences of the Filipinx community and act as a tumawag (or call out) for structural change, as the socioeconomic systems that are currently in place foster and rely on migrant workers' vulnerability.

Biographies

Erin San Antonio
Majors: Sociology and Social Sciences
Erin San Antonio was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest with roots reaching to the Pacific Islands of the Philippines. After becoming the first in their family to graduate from college in 2019 with an Associate of Arts (AA), they transferred to Portland State to further their education through a baccalaureate in sociology, social sciences and a minor in women's, gender, and sexuality studies. As a student at Portland State, their experiences as a first-generation child of immigrants informs the way they navigate their day-to-day. While in undergrad, Erin began providing sexual and relationship violence advocacy through their role as a student advocate at Portland Community College's Women's Resource Center, assisting students seeking services for Sexual and Domestic violence on campus. With a deep commitment to community care, Erin's work has been largely shaped by working closely alongside different Cultural, Queer, and Women's Resource Centers across institutions while holding active leadership positions in three other non-profit organizations. Guided by these experiences, they plan to pursue a graduate degree in Ethnic Studies to further represent and strengthen their dedication to community, while simultaneously supporting personal and organizational transformation and growth.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Alma Trinidad
Alma M. Ouanesisouk Trinidad, PhD, MSW is an associate professor in the School of Social Work at Portland State University (PSU). As a first generation college graduate and professional, born and raised on the island of Molokai, Hawai’i with family roots of Filipino immigration through the sugar and pineapple industries, she describes her voyage of serving the people and community as becoming a Pinay (Filipina) scholar warrior and guardian of kapu aloha (sacred love)/mahalaya (love and freedom). She earned her PhD in social welfare from the University of Washington, Seattle, her MSW from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and her BSW from the University of Hawai’i, Manoa. She is a macro social worker and scholar activist. She brings an array of scholarly work and practice in community development and organizing, policy analysis, organizational culture and processes, and collective impact in the areas of health promotion and education among diverse communities, and building strong children, youth, and families. Her scholarly work focuses on critical Indigenous pedagogy of place, youth empowerment, social determinants of health and education, youth and family participatory action research, social movements, and leadership and mentorship for social change. Other research and teaching interests include critical humanist design thinking, community practice, and culturally responsible research methods. Alma has passion for the arts, creative work, nature, and spirituality. Having mentored, informally and formally, youth to new colleagues in the field, Dr. Alma finds this work to be life changing and relational, always striving to build strong communities.

Disciplines

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33584

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Aug 12th, 11:55 AM

Challenging Narratives: The Implications of being perceived as an Agent of Development within the Filipinx Community

The aim of this research were threefold: (a) to explore the perceptions of migrant workers from the Philippines and their working conditions; (b) to assess the relationship between the effects of migrant work, transnational and diasporic families, and mental health; and (c) to examine how the trauma experienced as a product of migrant work becomes intergenerational. As those within the greater Filipinx community are labeled as "agents of development," it directly impacts the workers involved by masking the exploitation, harassment, and violence they may go through finding work overseas. In particular, this study will look into examining the factors that administer this population vulnerable to exploitation, paying attention to gendered dynamics and power relations. Conducted through a qualitative study, this research will be deeply rooted in storytelling through anonymous interview surveys, following the transmission of mental health implications across multigenerational families. The hope is to highlight and underscore the personal and lived experiences of the Filipinx community and act as a tumawag (or call out) for structural change, as the socioeconomic systems that are currently in place foster and rely on migrant workers' vulnerability.