Title

Climate Change Will Increase the Vector Capacity of the Aedes aegypti in South America: A Systematic Map

Date

12-8-2020 11:25 AM

Abstract

Tropical infectious diseases such as dengue, chikungunya, and Zika affect millions of people annually in all regions of the world. The disease burden propagated by these arboviruses has rapidly increased in recent decades due to the range expansion of their shared vector, the Aedes aegypti mosquito. The IPCC has predicted a global increase in temperatures of 1.4-5.8°C over the next century; understanding how that will affect the vector capacity of the Aedes aegypti is essential for public health planning. This paper will examine findings from a systematic map of the current state of research on this increasingly important influence on infectious disease in South America. The objectives are to: (1) assess the geographical regions represented, and (2) identify potential gaps in the existing literature. We searched relevant public health, agricultural, and environmental health databases for studies published between January 1, 1980, and March 6, 2020, that evaluate the relationship between temperature and Aedes aegypti populations. The resulting literature that meets the criteria for inclusion will then undergo an inductive qualitative analysis for systematic data extraction. Subsequently, they will then be compared by geographical region in order to identify a potential dearth of research on South America.

Biographies

Liliana Diaz
Majors: Biology and Public Health
Liliana is a junior double-majoring in Biology and Public Health and minoring in Spanish. She is a McNair, LSAMP, and BUILD EXITO scholar. She is part of the VirtuOHSU surgical simulation lab at Oregon Health & Science University; she also participated in the OpTrust Intraoperative Entrustment Study, a research collaboration between OHSU and the University of Michigan. Her research interests include virology, immunology, emerging infectious diseases, and neglected tropical infectious diseases. Liliana is particularly interested in how public health intersects with these research areas and believes integrating these fields further will help the surveillance and control of communicable diseases. After graduation, she plans to obtain a MS in infectious disease epidemiology, then either pursue a MD/PhD or PhD in virology and microbial pathogenesis.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Richard Lockwood
Dr. Dozal-Lockwood joined the full-time teaching faculty in 2008. He helps integrate the School of Public Health with the larger University community through courses that focus on interdisciplinarity. Since 2015 he has worked on the University Studies Council and developed and implemented the multi-level Awards for Excellence in Teaching. Dr. Dozal-Lockwood has taught more than a dozen different graduate and undergraduate courses, including Social Research Methods, Quantitative Research Design & Analysis, Integrative Health and Systems Thinking, Health Behavior & the Social Environment, Global Health, Health & Health Systems, Careers in Health & Health Care, and the Political Economics of Alternative Medicine Dr. Dozal-Lockwood regularly participates in the mentorship of top students through independent research abroad. Recent examples include mentored research in Nepal, South Africa, Cuba, Ghana, Uganda, India and Peru. He has a long record of promoting equity and inclusion through his work with the DOE funded McNair Scholars and both the NIH funded Bridges to Baccalaureate Program, and BUILD EXITO. His service to the University also includes mentoring several students through the thesis process of Honors College. Dr. Dozal-Lockwood earned his Ph.D. in Systems Science & Sociology, and his MPH in Health Policy & Administration from Portland State University. His degree in Experimental Psychology from the University of Texas in El Paso led to clinical work in Neurology as an Electroencephalographic Technologist. As a Research Associate with the Portland Hand Surgery & Rehabilitation Center he published on the occupational epidemiology of carpal tunnel syndrome. As a Research Analyst for the Foundation for Accountability he contributed to the psychometric development of health care quality indicators used in industry report cards. His extensive work in industry includes survey research firms, general hospitals, surgical practices and mental health facilities; experiences that anchor his lessons on career development and transdisciplinary.

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33581

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Aug 12th, 11:25 AM

Climate Change Will Increase the Vector Capacity of the Aedes aegypti in South America: A Systematic Map

Tropical infectious diseases such as dengue, chikungunya, and Zika affect millions of people annually in all regions of the world. The disease burden propagated by these arboviruses has rapidly increased in recent decades due to the range expansion of their shared vector, the Aedes aegypti mosquito. The IPCC has predicted a global increase in temperatures of 1.4-5.8°C over the next century; understanding how that will affect the vector capacity of the Aedes aegypti is essential for public health planning. This paper will examine findings from a systematic map of the current state of research on this increasingly important influence on infectious disease in South America. The objectives are to: (1) assess the geographical regions represented, and (2) identify potential gaps in the existing literature. We searched relevant public health, agricultural, and environmental health databases for studies published between January 1, 1980, and March 6, 2020, that evaluate the relationship between temperature and Aedes aegypti populations. The resulting literature that meets the criteria for inclusion will then undergo an inductive qualitative analysis for systematic data extraction. Subsequently, they will then be compared by geographical region in order to identify a potential dearth of research on South America.