Title

Centering Children in Co-Parenting

Date

12-8-2020 2:05 PM

Abstract

Comprehensive systems theory identifies several associated risk factors and consequences of separation but, research suggests that legal divorce itself has few direct effects on children (Amato, 2000). While there is diversity in children’s responses to separation, generally associated risk factors are behavioral disruptions, emotional upheaval, anger, resentment, anxiety, guilt and depression (Wallerstein, 1985; Wallerstein, 1987; Hetherington, Cox and Cox, 1985). Parents abilities to cope with their divorce are critical to the child’s adjustment and, if parents are able to control their feelings toward their ex-spouse, cooperate in parenting, negotiate differences, and settle their quarrels in privacy, their children will show fewer social and emotional problems (Tschannetal, 1989; Wallerstein and Blakeslee, 1989; Buchanan, 1991; Hetherington, 1999; Sumari, 2019). It’s expected that the curriculum design and implementations will address these complex needs of families. A thematic analysis is being done of Cooperative Parenting and Divorce: Shielding Your Child from Conflict written by Susan Boyan. The thematic analysis will identify major themes, contextualize the curriculum and its implementation. The analysis seeks to identify how children are centered in this curriculum regarding legal divorce and separation.

Biographies

Kristen Wiidanen
Major: Social Work

Kristen Wiidanen is living and working in Portland, OR. Her postsecondary academic story started in 2012 at Portland Community College, where she studied Early Childhood Education. After realizing that she was passionate about serving children through their parents, Kristen transferred to Clackamas Community College. She graduated with a 4.0 GPA, a Human Services degree, an 8lb. 11oz. daughter, the thoughtfulness and the drive to provide a secure yet adventurous life for her growing family. So, she pursued her dream of living in downtown Portland and attending Portland State University. In the School of Social Work at PSU, Dr. Ericka Kimball offered Kristen a research assistant position on the Behavioral Health Integration Project. That opportunity, coupled with research and policy coursework, expanded Kristen’s visions for her future. Kristen will continue on to a master’s degree program. Her research will explore child-centeredness but will shift in focus from parenting curriculum to policy advocacy. Kristen plans to become a beloved Mama, PhD as a way to break generational cycles of addiction and suicide in her family and, to demonstrate to her daughter strength, humility, purpose and wisdom.

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ericka Kimball
Ericka Kimball (pronouns: She/Hers), PhD, LCSW, is an Associate Professor and Principal Investigator for the Behavioral Health Integration Project at Portland State University. She has nearly 10 years of experience in various healthcare settings including long-term care, in-patient mental health, and acute care hospital. At Portland State University, she teaches across MSW and BSW programs with a focus on health care practice and health policy. Her work also includes providing training and technical assistance to health care agencies. Finally, she collaborates with domestic violence agencies across the state of Oregon to promote the integration of community-based domestic violence advocates in health care settings.

Disciplines

Social Work

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33594

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Aug 12th, 2:05 PM

Centering Children in Co-Parenting

Comprehensive systems theory identifies several associated risk factors and consequences of separation but, research suggests that legal divorce itself has few direct effects on children (Amato, 2000). While there is diversity in children’s responses to separation, generally associated risk factors are behavioral disruptions, emotional upheaval, anger, resentment, anxiety, guilt and depression (Wallerstein, 1985; Wallerstein, 1987; Hetherington, Cox and Cox, 1985). Parents abilities to cope with their divorce are critical to the child’s adjustment and, if parents are able to control their feelings toward their ex-spouse, cooperate in parenting, negotiate differences, and settle their quarrels in privacy, their children will show fewer social and emotional problems (Tschannetal, 1989; Wallerstein and Blakeslee, 1989; Buchanan, 1991; Hetherington, 1999; Sumari, 2019). It’s expected that the curriculum design and implementations will address these complex needs of families. A thematic analysis is being done of Cooperative Parenting and Divorce: Shielding Your Child from Conflict written by Susan Boyan. The thematic analysis will identify major themes, contextualize the curriculum and its implementation. The analysis seeks to identify how children are centered in this curriculum regarding legal divorce and separation.