Title

Improving Patient-Provider Perceptions through Alternate Intake Forms

Date

12-8-2020 9:40 AM

Abstract

This study examines the effects of implementing alternative intake formats for Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) screenings in the LGBTQ+ community. STIs are on the rise in the US and vital information on health outcomes of the LGBTQ+ subpopulation is lacking. Existing literature has focused mainly on qualitative methods, focusing on identity disclosure and access to healthcare providers for the LGBTQ+ community. More work needs to be done using quantitative methods to examine the effect of healthcare provider communication. Using the theoretical framework of communication accommodation theory, the study answers the question: how would alternate intake formats affect patients experience? Results show that accommodating language towards the LGBTQ+ community has a positive impact on patient trust, safety, confidence, and retention; all of which are indicators of successful patient-provider centered communication. These results fortify existing literature on this topic and also have strong implications for providers in practice to use more accommodating language to improve patient-provider communication and outcomes with vulnerable communities.

Biographies

Christian Torres
Major: Communication
Christian Torres is majoring in Communication Studies Portland State University. During his time at PSU, he spent six months interning for Cascade AIDS Project as a Communication and Health Program Research Specialist. Christian’s interest in research grew during his internship, and he learned that he could use research to help minority communities who face health inequities. His desire to strengthen his research and analytical skills led him to the McNair Scholars Program. Christian is honored to be finishing his last term at Portland State University as a McNair scholar and a learning assistant for a core Communications course. He looks forward to sharing what he has learned with his peers before he graduates this year. He is very thankful for all the wonderful opportunities that his academic career has brought his way and plans to continue his higher education in pursuing a master’s in Public Health. Upon completing his master’s, Christian plans to obtain a PhD and help continue to shift the world of Public Health in a more equitable direction.

Dr. Brianne Suldovsky
Dr. Brianne Suldovsky specializes in science communication and public engagement. Her research examines how scientists engage the public and public understanding of controversial science. Her recent research explores public understanding of topics including genetic engineering (i.e. GMOs), climate change, and air pollution. Dr. Suldovsky collaborates with a diversity of experts and community partners including environmental scientists, economists, geographers, climatologists, and philosophers.

Disciplines

Communication

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33525

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Aug 12th, 9:40 AM

Improving Patient-Provider Perceptions through Alternate Intake Forms

This study examines the effects of implementing alternative intake formats for Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) screenings in the LGBTQ+ community. STIs are on the rise in the US and vital information on health outcomes of the LGBTQ+ subpopulation is lacking. Existing literature has focused mainly on qualitative methods, focusing on identity disclosure and access to healthcare providers for the LGBTQ+ community. More work needs to be done using quantitative methods to examine the effect of healthcare provider communication. Using the theoretical framework of communication accommodation theory, the study answers the question: how would alternate intake formats affect patients experience? Results show that accommodating language towards the LGBTQ+ community has a positive impact on patient trust, safety, confidence, and retention; all of which are indicators of successful patient-provider centered communication. These results fortify existing literature on this topic and also have strong implications for providers in practice to use more accommodating language to improve patient-provider communication and outcomes with vulnerable communities.