Title

Nerve Tissue Targeted Fluorophore Synthesis: From Scheme to Administration

Date

11-8-2021 11:00 AM

Abstract

Nerve tissue damage as a result of surgical injury is a common negative outcome during many surgical interventions (Rogers et al, 2002). Depending on the site of the injury and the amount of cellular damage, nerve tissue injury may potentially have a life altering effect on the surgical patient. (Hall, 2005). Surgery that is fluorescence guided will aid in the visualization of nerve structure patterns and as a result may significantly improve patient outcomes. In this research, I will synthesize a small set of fluorescent contrast agents which may highlight nerve tissue in real time with great sensitivity and in high contrast. Absorption and fluorescence spectra will be collected as a way to evaluate each agent. Systemic administration of the novel agents in rodents will help define nerve specificity. In order to observe tissue intensity and nerve signal to background ratios, images of the surgical sites will be collected and quantified. The knowledge garnered from this study will greatly help inform nerve tissue specific, clinical grade, contrast agent development.

Biographies

Cassandra Mathieson, Public Health Studies and General Science; Minor: Biology

Cassandra Mathieson is currently completing her junior year at Portland State. She is a first generation college student and a double major in public health: pre-clinical health sciences and general science, with a minor in biology. Cassandra is a non traditional student who returned to school in adulthood. Prior to transferring to PSU, she spent time studying at Portland Community College, where she developed a strong appreciation for the financial accessibility and quality instruction available through public college education. Cassandra is currently assisting Ph.D. candidate organic chemistry research in the Strongin Lab at PSU, and is a current McNair Scholar. When not engaged in academic or research pursuits, Cassandra is passionate about her community volunteer work in animal rescue. She is also employed full time as a shelter and housing case manager for a Clackamas County based nonprofit, serving survivors of domestic and sexual violence who are experiencing houselessness. After successfully completing her baccalaureate degree, Cassandra hopes to successfully matriculate to a dual MD/Ph.D. program to train as a medical scientist. It is her hope that through a combination of research efforts and clinical practice, she might work to decrease the gap in access to competent care for marginalized populations in Oregon.

Dr. Robert Strongin, Faculty Mentor, Department of Chemistry

Dr. Robert M. Strongin is a Professor of Organic Chemistry at Portland State University. He received his B.A. degree in Chemistry (Honors) from Temple University. Upon graduation he worked as an industrial chemist at FMC Corporation and later at SmithKline Beecham (now GlaxoSmithKline). He then enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania where he earned his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry. Dr. Strongin began his independent career upon receiving his doctorate as a member of the faculty in the Department of Chemistry at Louisiana State University. At LSU he rose steadily through the ranks to the level of endowed professor. In 2007 he was recruited by the Portland State University chemistry department, where he currently has an active research program focusing on tobacco and cannabis vaping, disease diagnostics, pharmaceutical design and synthesis and biomolecular mechanisms of disease. He is a founder of two biotech startup companies, and regularly chairs NIH study sections and an NIH/FDA panel on electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDs) toxicology. Dr. Strongin is an ardent supporter of underrepresented groups in STEM. He was the founding director of the IMSD Program at LSU and has also served as director of LSAMP at PSU. He has written four books and has co- authored over 150 peer-reviewed manuscripts that have been cited over 10,000 times. He has received research and teaching awards throughout his career. At PSU these have included the Presidential Career Research Award and the John Eliot Allen Teaching Award.

Disciplines

Chemistry

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/36189

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Aug 11th, 11:00 AM

Nerve Tissue Targeted Fluorophore Synthesis: From Scheme to Administration

Nerve tissue damage as a result of surgical injury is a common negative outcome during many surgical interventions (Rogers et al, 2002). Depending on the site of the injury and the amount of cellular damage, nerve tissue injury may potentially have a life altering effect on the surgical patient. (Hall, 2005). Surgery that is fluorescence guided will aid in the visualization of nerve structure patterns and as a result may significantly improve patient outcomes. In this research, I will synthesize a small set of fluorescent contrast agents which may highlight nerve tissue in real time with great sensitivity and in high contrast. Absorption and fluorescence spectra will be collected as a way to evaluate each agent. Systemic administration of the novel agents in rodents will help define nerve specificity. In order to observe tissue intensity and nerve signal to background ratios, images of the surgical sites will be collected and quantified. The knowledge garnered from this study will greatly help inform nerve tissue specific, clinical grade, contrast agent development.