Title

The Role Of Neighborhood and Social Determinants of Health: Investigating Health-Related Social Needs Among The Portland Metropolitan Area in Oregon

Date

8-11-2021 11:45 AM

Abstract

Intersecting factors of social determinants of health have a significant impact on both individual and community well-being, however, a growing body of research highlights disproportionate disparities among neighborhood locations. Accessible resources, clinics, programs, and other community infrastructure are some characteristics that promote a healthy local economy. Locations lacking these aspects are where concentrated areas of poverty are inclined to exist, which often, correlate to higher rates of basic needs and adverse health outcomes. As part of the Accountable Health Communities (AHC) project—a 5-year research study to bridge the gap between clinical and social providers to lower hospitalization and total cost of care—this study will aim to investigate how health-related social needs (HRSN) differ within three urban counties in the Portland metropolitan area in Oregon among Medicaid beneficiaries. Adopting the same materials from the AHC model, a 19-question survey was administered to 17,822 patients assessing for five areas of HRSNs: housing, food, transportation, and safety needs. Patients (n=7,952) residing in Multnomah, Washington, and Clackamas county were filtered from the dataset to compare the proportion of needs for each location and the number of needs per person within the counties. Data will be mapped using Tableau to visualize the spread of HRSNs across the regions. Implications from this research may help to call attention to more tailored resources and programs to fit the needs of residents in efforts of eliminating disparities within these communities.

Biographies

Roselie Agulto, Public Health

Roselie Agulto is a senior majoring in public health and a first-generation college student at Portland State University. Prior to her time at PSU, she received her associate’s degree in business at Northern Marianas College in Saipan. Through NMC, she received acceptance into the Child Health Assessment in the Pacific program at the University of Hawaii at Manoa where she investigated differences in eating habits among caregivers and children in Saipan. This has led the way towards now being a BUILD EXITO and McNair scholar. She currently interns at the Oregon Rural-Practice-Based Research Network at OHSU where she supports the outreach, screening, and referral of community resources to improve health outcomes for patients under the mentorship of Dr. Bruce Goldberg and Anne King. In addition to her accomplishments, she was a member of the API Forward Leadership Program where she delivered a winning presentation in collaboration with a team to identify gender and minority pay inequities for the Port of Portland. Roselie anticipates gaining the necessary skills and experiences through the McNair Program to pursue a master’s degree in Health Promotion in Fall of 2022. Looking ahead, she plans to obtain her Ph.D. in Public Health to continue research primarily focusing on health issues in the CNMI.

Dr. Bruce Goldberg, Faculty Mentor, School of Public Health

Bruce Goldberg, MD is a Professor at the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health and a nationally recognized consultant on health policy and the organization and delivery of health services. Bruce served two Oregon Governors, as the Director of the Oregon Office for Health Policy, Director of the Oregon Department of Human Services and then was the founding Director of the Oregon Health Authority. In that role, Bruce led Oregon’s nationally recognized health reforms transforming Oregon’s Medicaid system to one based on a model of coordinated care. His other experiences span time as an administrator of large complex organizations, a practicing clinician, teacher/academician, a county health officer, medical director for a Medicaid managed care organization and Clinical Director for the US Public Health Services in Zuni, New Mexico.

Disciplines

Public Health

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/36193

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Aug 11th, 11:45 AM

The Role Of Neighborhood and Social Determinants of Health: Investigating Health-Related Social Needs Among The Portland Metropolitan Area in Oregon

Intersecting factors of social determinants of health have a significant impact on both individual and community well-being, however, a growing body of research highlights disproportionate disparities among neighborhood locations. Accessible resources, clinics, programs, and other community infrastructure are some characteristics that promote a healthy local economy. Locations lacking these aspects are where concentrated areas of poverty are inclined to exist, which often, correlate to higher rates of basic needs and adverse health outcomes. As part of the Accountable Health Communities (AHC) project—a 5-year research study to bridge the gap between clinical and social providers to lower hospitalization and total cost of care—this study will aim to investigate how health-related social needs (HRSN) differ within three urban counties in the Portland metropolitan area in Oregon among Medicaid beneficiaries. Adopting the same materials from the AHC model, a 19-question survey was administered to 17,822 patients assessing for five areas of HRSNs: housing, food, transportation, and safety needs. Patients (n=7,952) residing in Multnomah, Washington, and Clackamas county were filtered from the dataset to compare the proportion of needs for each location and the number of needs per person within the counties. Data will be mapped using Tableau to visualize the spread of HRSNs across the regions. Implications from this research may help to call attention to more tailored resources and programs to fit the needs of residents in efforts of eliminating disparities within these communities.