Title

Spatial Analysis of African American Residency in Multnomah County according to the 2010 US Census

Date

11-8-2021 12:15 PM

Abstract

This project builds on the urban studies work of Dr. Karen Gibson by comparing currently available US Census data to see if the shifting demographic trends first observed in Bleeding Albina are still being reproduced in the contemporary urban space of Portland, Oregon. GIS software is employed to model principles of spatial analysis in the form of the Moran’s I and Getis-Ord clustering algorithms to the currently available 2010 US Census data of Multnomah County. This project has a more expansive spatial focus than Bleeding Albina, in that it will look at demographic shifts across Multnomah County, in addition to census tracts within the Albina neighborhoods. By looking at a larger area, we see the inflow of Black residents into other Portland neighborhoods in addition to their outflow from Albina. This study analyzes the dispersion of the African American residents from the historically segregated Albina neighborhood into the rest of Multnomah County to determine if spatial analysis of the data shows modern clustering effects or if the demographic movement out from the Albina diaspora has been to statistically randomized regions. By doing so we can better learn how economic factors such as gentrification cause ongoing demographic shifts within urban areas. Additionally, this project demonstrates a method by which future research produced with these models, using a broader scope of racial and income data over a longer period, can be employed by urban planners to track neighborhood demographics for purposes of ensuring equitable distribution of public resources within the urban built environment.

Biographies

Red Burkett, Geography

Red Burkett is currently pursuing a degree in geography at Portland State University. His interest in the field stems from his childhood exposure to the larger world through his grandmother’s extensive collection of maps and books describing far off places and people. Currently, Red is conducting spatial analysis research on urban gentrification and demographic shifts among Portland neighborhoods east of the Willamette River, in the hopes of exploring the effect of racial capitalism on the urban ecology of inner-city and suburban neighborhoods. His professional aspiration is to earn a Ph.D. and teach at the collegiate level. Red believes that the increased presence of indigenous faculty correlates with increasing enrollment and graduation rates among Indigenous students. Navigating the complicated channels of academia can be difficult and Red has been lucky to have met passionate and knowledgeable mentors to advise him along the way. Through a career in academia, Red intends to invest his knowledge and learned experience into the next generation of low-income and underrepresented students. Red looks forward to doing research that focuses on decolonization, counter-mapping, and Indigenous land claims, while working to increase the mainstreaming and empirical legitimization of Traditional Knowledge Systems developed by Indigenous societies over the centuries. The photo above is a cedar tree Red replanted during his time as a gardener at the PSU Native Center.

Dr. Jola Ajibade, Faculty Mentor, Department of Geography

Dr. Idowu Jola Ajibade is an Assistant Professor of Geography at Portland State University. Her research lies at the intersections of climate adaptation, urban development, resilience planning, societal transformation and multiple dimensions of justice. She applies a political ecology lens to study how individuals, communities and cities respond to climate change and their different capacities for adaptation and transformation. Specifically, she examines the politics of adaptation, demonstrating how historical injustices, state practices, relocation programs, and utopian solutions to climate change intertwine with exclusionary planning policies and development patterns to undermine disadvantaged and marginalized communities. Dr. Ajibade emphasizes the articulation of multiple solutions and alternative pathways to climate adaptation that includes partnering with grassroots coalitions, frontline communities, indigenous groups, cooperatives, social entrepreneurs, and small businesses. Her research has been published in the Journal of Global Environmental Change, Climatic Change, Climate and Development, among other outlets. Dr. Ajibade has also been featured in Science Friday, NPR, Yale Environment 360, New Internationalist, and Vice. She published two books on climate relocation, managed retreat and social justice.

Disciplines

Geography | Urban Studies and Planning

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/36195

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Aug 11th, 12:15 PM

Spatial Analysis of African American Residency in Multnomah County according to the 2010 US Census

This project builds on the urban studies work of Dr. Karen Gibson by comparing currently available US Census data to see if the shifting demographic trends first observed in Bleeding Albina are still being reproduced in the contemporary urban space of Portland, Oregon. GIS software is employed to model principles of spatial analysis in the form of the Moran’s I and Getis-Ord clustering algorithms to the currently available 2010 US Census data of Multnomah County. This project has a more expansive spatial focus than Bleeding Albina, in that it will look at demographic shifts across Multnomah County, in addition to census tracts within the Albina neighborhoods. By looking at a larger area, we see the inflow of Black residents into other Portland neighborhoods in addition to their outflow from Albina. This study analyzes the dispersion of the African American residents from the historically segregated Albina neighborhood into the rest of Multnomah County to determine if spatial analysis of the data shows modern clustering effects or if the demographic movement out from the Albina diaspora has been to statistically randomized regions. By doing so we can better learn how economic factors such as gentrification cause ongoing demographic shifts within urban areas. Additionally, this project demonstrates a method by which future research produced with these models, using a broader scope of racial and income data over a longer period, can be employed by urban planners to track neighborhood demographics for purposes of ensuring equitable distribution of public resources within the urban built environment.