Title

Exploring the Impact of Interpersonal Trust on Health Outcomes in Rapidly Gentrifying Neighborhoods in Portland, Oregon

Date

11-8-2021 9:30 AM

Abstract

Social determinants have been recognized to be significant factors contributing to the overall health outcomes of individuals. However, there is limited research on how these factors have directly impacted the mental and physical wellness of people in neighborhoods who are experiencing rapid gentrification. The objective of this study is to determine whether the level of interpersonal trust present between individuals in neighborhoods is associated with the mental and physical health outcomes among its residents. This quantitative study uses the Albina-Rockwood Neighborhood Promise Survey, which uses data from a random sample of families living in two rapidly gentrified neighborhoods in Portland, Oregon. We will explore the relationship between neighborhoods using self-related mental and physical health questions. We hypothesize that trust will positively be related to better overall health results. Residents with a higher degree of trust, will have greater physical and mental health outcomes. We will also look at the impacts of trust on different demographics and across class strata. These findings suggest that future studies should examine how race and social class can affect the magnitude of trust in a neighborhood.

Biographies

Julie Ha, Public Health Studies and General Science

Julie Ha is a second-year undergraduate double-majoring in public health studies: pre-clinical health sciences and general science. She is currently a part of the McNair Scholars Program at Portland State University. Julie was previously involved in the URSA Engage program at Oregon State University, where she worked with Dr. Yumie Takata to study the effects of vitamins and mineral supplements on non-small cell lung cancer. As a McNair Scholar, her focus is exploring the impact of interpersonal trust on health outcomes in rapidly gentrified neighborhoods in Portland, Oregon. Her research interest encompasses identifying different social determinants and how they can affect the well-being of individuals in deprived neighborhoods. As an Asian-American and first-generation college student, Julie is passionate about advocating for more accessible and equitable health care for low-income BIPOC communities. She is planning to attend medical school after acquiring her Bachelor’s of Science Degree and pursue a career in family medicine. Julie strongly believes in the importance of establishing a healthy community and is committed to pushing for a better public health infrastructure.

Dr. Yves Labisierre, Faculty Mentor, School of Public Health

Yves Labissiere is a social psychologist who works to understand how race, identity, language, difference, power, and privilege play a role in education and health systems. His aim is to develop strategies that heal and empower individuals and transform systems. He has studied the health effects of gentrification and residential displacement on Black men in Portland, OR. He has worked on curriculum for Portland State University’s BUILD EXITO Program, which works to build infrastructure to support underrepresented students interested in the health sciences. He worked on a project with the Portland Police Bureau to test how positive police-community interactions might help address crime and build trust. He is also working on a new project with Portland police to better understand how police work with, or could better work with, mental health professionals when they encounter calls that involve people who may need mental health help.

Disciplines

Public Health

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/36181

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Aug 11th, 9:30 AM

Exploring the Impact of Interpersonal Trust on Health Outcomes in Rapidly Gentrifying Neighborhoods in Portland, Oregon

Social determinants have been recognized to be significant factors contributing to the overall health outcomes of individuals. However, there is limited research on how these factors have directly impacted the mental and physical wellness of people in neighborhoods who are experiencing rapid gentrification. The objective of this study is to determine whether the level of interpersonal trust present between individuals in neighborhoods is associated with the mental and physical health outcomes among its residents. This quantitative study uses the Albina-Rockwood Neighborhood Promise Survey, which uses data from a random sample of families living in two rapidly gentrified neighborhoods in Portland, Oregon. We will explore the relationship between neighborhoods using self-related mental and physical health questions. We hypothesize that trust will positively be related to better overall health results. Residents with a higher degree of trust, will have greater physical and mental health outcomes. We will also look at the impacts of trust on different demographics and across class strata. These findings suggest that future studies should examine how race and social class can affect the magnitude of trust in a neighborhood.