Title

Perceptual Mismatch Between Meso and Macro Policy at Tokyo International University

Date

11-8-2021 10:25 AM

Abstract

Previous studies have aimed at looking at meso and micro policy levels of Japanese educational institutions and their English language teaching programs. Through conducting surveys and interviews, researchers gained knowledge of how, or if, institutions portray their standards to students and staff and how those goals are displayed through curriculum. This research shows a disconnect between the stated goals and in class instruction. While the researchers looked at overall disconnects, none looked at specific universities and their programs. My study aims to fill that gap, focusing on a university known for its English teaching and production skills. The intention is to find if there is a perceptual mismatch between documented university English proficiency standards at Tokyo International University and what is communicated with students. This investigation explores how (or if) their goals are communicated and if the students believe they are able to communicate in English conversational settings.

Biographies

Brianna Ross, Applied Linguistics

Brianna Ross graduated from Mount Hood Community College in her senior year of high school with her AAOT, and has been pursuing her Bachelor’s of Art in Applied Linguistics with an interest in Japanese. She is currently a McNair Scholar and the Vice President of the Japanese Student Society. Her work is influenced by the inequalities found in the educational settings and how they are influenced by language policy and multiculturalism. Her research interests are in the use of language in education policy. Brianna believes that continuing research on multiculturalism and education policy can help bridge the gaps in educational settings and promote bilingual educational settings that allow students to express their own identities through their language use without the pressures of assimilation. In the Fall of 2024, she would like to pursue her Ph.D. in Educational Policy to further her knowledge and question the educational systems.

Dr. Kimberly Brown, Faculty Mentor, Professor of Applied Linguistics

Kimberley Brown is Professor of Applied Linguistics/International and Global Studies. She begins her 32nd year here at PSU this fall. Her research interests include intercultural communication, teacher pedagogy, and World Englishes. With her colleague Shawn Smallman, she is the co-author of Introduction to International and Global Studies. She completed her MA TESOL and Ph.D. in Second Languages and Cultures Education at the University of Minnesota. She has taught and published about her work in Iran. She is a passionate supporter of McNair and her students.

Disciplines

Linguistics

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/36186

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Aug 11th, 10:25 AM

Perceptual Mismatch Between Meso and Macro Policy at Tokyo International University

Previous studies have aimed at looking at meso and micro policy levels of Japanese educational institutions and their English language teaching programs. Through conducting surveys and interviews, researchers gained knowledge of how, or if, institutions portray their standards to students and staff and how those goals are displayed through curriculum. This research shows a disconnect between the stated goals and in class instruction. While the researchers looked at overall disconnects, none looked at specific universities and their programs. My study aims to fill that gap, focusing on a university known for its English teaching and production skills. The intention is to find if there is a perceptual mismatch between documented university English proficiency standards at Tokyo International University and what is communicated with students. This investigation explores how (or if) their goals are communicated and if the students believe they are able to communicate in English conversational settings.