Presentation Type

Panel Discussion

Program Description

In 2011, cIRcle, the University of British Columbia’s open access digital repository, formally accepted a decentralized repository staffing model following a full day planning retreat with key Library stakeholders. Six years later staff has grown to include two FTE Digital Repository Librarians, one FTE support staff, as well as secured metadata review commitments from a Librarian and two cataloguers in Technical Services in addition to regular deposit support from student employees. With increased capacity has come robust and well-documented metadata standards that support interoperability; automated content ingest streams; improved permissions review support to meet growth in faculty requests; streamlined workflows; and strategic content recruitment efforts. This presentation will review how cIRcle evolved from pilot project to top ranking Canadian IR by employing key strategies to advocate for staff allocations that are adaptable to a range of academic institutions. Both successes and failures of cIRcle’s workflows and initiatives using the decentralized model will highlight ongoing challenges of and insights into supporting existing and emerging trends in repository services.

Start Date

21-7-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

21-7-2017 9:20 AM

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/20665

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Jul 21st, 9:00 AM Jul 21st, 9:20 AM

From Pilot Project to Three FTE: UBC's decentralized repository staffing model

In 2011, cIRcle, the University of British Columbia’s open access digital repository, formally accepted a decentralized repository staffing model following a full day planning retreat with key Library stakeholders. Six years later staff has grown to include two FTE Digital Repository Librarians, one FTE support staff, as well as secured metadata review commitments from a Librarian and two cataloguers in Technical Services in addition to regular deposit support from student employees. With increased capacity has come robust and well-documented metadata standards that support interoperability; automated content ingest streams; improved permissions review support to meet growth in faculty requests; streamlined workflows; and strategic content recruitment efforts. This presentation will review how cIRcle evolved from pilot project to top ranking Canadian IR by employing key strategies to advocate for staff allocations that are adaptable to a range of academic institutions. Both successes and failures of cIRcle’s workflows and initiatives using the decentralized model will highlight ongoing challenges of and insights into supporting existing and emerging trends in repository services.